Professor Peter Halley

Professor

School of Chemical Engineering
Faculty of Engineering, Architecture and Information Technology

Affiliate Professor

Australian Institute for Bioengineering and Nanotechnology

Overview

Peter is a Professor in polymer processing in Chemical Engineering, an Adjunct Group Leader in the Australian Institute for Bioengineering and Nanotechnology (AIBN), a chief investigator in Advanced Materials Processing and Manufacturing (AMPAM) centre and a founding member of UQ Plastics.

Peter works at the translational research interface between universities and industry. Specifically his research involves rheology, processing and product design of bio-based materials, polymers and nanocomposite materials. He has worked in industry (SRI international, Sola Optical, Moldflow), has worked in four cooperative research centres (CRCs -Food Packaging, Sugar Innovation, Polymers and Fighting Food Waste), has acquired and managed continuous government and industry research projects since 1994, was heavily involved in the spinoff of Plantic Technologies from the CRC food packaging in 2002 (and ongoing research support with them until 2016), and was involved in the research that led to the TenasiTech (TPU nanocomposite) spinoff from UQ in 2007. Peter has led translational research projects in biopolymers and biofluid platforms for agrifood, biomedical and high-value manufacturing sectors which have attracted more than $14 million in government and industry funding; and produced patents, licences and new industrial know-how.

Peter is a fellow of the institute of chemical engineers (IChemE) and a fellow of the Royal Australian Chemical Institute (RACI). Peter is on the editorial board of the Plastics, Rubbers and Composites, Starch, the Journal of Renewable Materials, Green Materials and Functional Composite Materials-Springer-Nature. He has experience on the boards of the UQ Dow Centre, the UQ RTA Centre, and the UQ-HBIS Sustainable Steel Innovation Centre. He won IChemE Shedden Uhde Award and Prize for excellence in Chemical Engineering (2004), the CRC Sugar innovation award (2008), the CRCPolymers Chairman’s award for research and commercialisation (2011), and has received the CRC Association Technology Transfer Award, twice, in 2002 and 2015.

Research:

Current projects are focused on developing new sustainable and bio-based polymers and biochemicals from formulation through to degradation/disposal, understanding processing of nanostructured polymers, developing smarter biopolymers and materials for biomedical, drug delivery, food and high value applications, understanding rheology and processing of a range of polymer, foods and liquids and is involved in new initiatives in circular plastics.

Teaching and Learning:

His teaching has spanned Introduction to Engineering Design, Engineering Thermodynamics, Polymer Engineering, Process Economics, Research Thesis and Engineering Management. My overall teaching goal is to be a relevant, well organised, enthusiastic and empathetic enabler of learning using multiple teaching and learning modes, and be highly connected to current industrial practices and cutting edge research.

International links

Professor Halley has been visiting or invited professor at ENSICAEN-University Normandy, University of Nottingham, Queen’s University Belfast, the University of Strasbourg and Institut national des sciences appliquées (INSA) de Lyon in France. He also has strong international collaborations with the US Department of Agriculture, Albany, USA; Colorado School of Mines, USA; AnoxKaldnes, Sweden; University of Bradford, University of Warwick, University of Nottingham, University of Sheffield, UK, SCION, NZ; Michigan State University, USA, Sichuan University China and many Australian universities.

Research Interests

  • Sustainable materials and polymers
    Current projects are focused on developing new sustainable and bio-based polymers and biochemicals from formulation through to degradation/disposal, understanding processing of nanostructured polymers, developing smarter biopolymers and materials for biomedical, drug delivery, food and high value applications and understanding rheology and processing of a range of polymer, foods and liquids, and circular plastics.

Research Impacts

Professor Peter Halley is a leading international expert in bio-based polymers and translational polymer research. His initial work on Australia's first biodegradable thermoplastic starch polymers led to the establishment of spin-off company Plantic Technologies, more than $75 million in venture financing, sales of commercially-viable products and a continued research provider relationship with Plantic. Professor Halley has led translational research projects in biopolymers and biofluid platforms for agrifood, biomedical and high-value manufacturing sectors which have attracted more than $14 million in government and industry funding; and produced patents, licences and new industrial know-how.

Qualifications

  • Graduate Cert of Higher Education, The University of Queensland
  • PhD, The University of Queensland
  • Bachelor of Engineering, The University of Queensland

Publications

View all Publications

Available Projects

  • Part of ARC Linkage grant with Dr Paul Luckman and Dr Brenton Fletcher

  • with Dr Brenton Fletcher

View all Available Projects

Publications

Book

Book Chapter

  • Nikoli, M, Colwell, J., Yeh, C.-L., Cash, G., Laycock, B., Gauthier, E., Halley, P., Bottle, S. and George, G. (2021). Real-World Factors That Impact Polyolefin Lifetimes. Lifetimes and Compatibility of Synthetic Polymers. edited by James Lewicki and George Overturf. *: Wiley.

  • Xie, Fengwei, Pollet, Eric, Halley, Peter J. and Avérous, Luc (2015). Advanced nano-biocomposites based on starch. Polysaccharides: bioactivity and biotechnology. (pp. 1467-1553) edited by Kishan Gopal Ramawat and Jean-Michel Mérillon. Cham, Switzerland: Springer International Publishing. doi: 10.1007/978-3-319-03751-6_50-1

  • Xie, F., Avérous, L., Halley, P. J. and Liu, P. (2015). Mechanical performance of starch-based biocomposites. Biocomposites: Design and Mechanical Performance. (pp. 53-92) edited by Misra, Manjusri, Pandey, Jitendra K and Mohanty, Amar K. Cambridge, United Kingdom: Woodhead Publishing. doi: 10.1016/B978-1-78242-373-7.00011-1

  • Tan, I. and Halley, Peter J. (2014). "Structure-Property" relationships of genetically modified starch. Starch Polymers: From Genetic Engineering to Green Applications. (pp. 31-73) edited by Peter J. Halley and Luc Avérous. Burlington, MA, USA: Elsevier. doi: 10.1016/B978-0-444-53730-0.00020-8

  • Averous, Luc and Halley, Peter J. (2014). Introduction. Starch polymers: from genetic engineering to green applications. (pp. xxi-xxi) edited by Peter J. Halley and Luc Avérous. Burlington, MA USA: Elsevier. doi: 10.1016/B978-0-444-53730-0.09986-3

  • Chaléat, C., Halley, Peter J. and Truss, R. W. (2014). Mechanical properties of starch-based plastics. Starch Polymers: From Genetic Engineering to Green Applications. (pp. 187-205) edited by Peter J. Halley and Luc R. Avérous. Burlington, MA, USA: Elsevier. doi: 10.1016/B978-0-444-53730-0.00023-3

  • Maliger, R. B. and Halley, Peter J. (2014). Reactive extrusion for thermoplastic starch-polymer blends. Starch Polymers: From Genetic Engineering to Green Applications. (pp. 291-315) edited by Peter J. Halley and Luc R. Avérous. Burlington, MA, USA: Elsevier. doi: 10.1016/B978-0-444-53730-0.00030-0

  • Laycock, Bronwyn G. and Halley, Peter J. (2014). Starch applications: state of market and new trends. Starch Polymers: From Genetic Engineering to Green Applications. (pp. 381-414) edited by Peter J. Halley and Luc R. Avérous. Burlington, MA, USA: Elsevier. doi: 10.1016/B978-0-444-53730-0.00026-9

  • Shrestha, Ashok K. and Halley, Peter J. (2014). Starch modification to develop novel starch-biopolymer blends: state of art and perspectives. Starch Polymers: From Genetic Engineering to Green Applications. (pp. 105-137) edited by Peter J. Halley and Luc R. Avérous. Burlington, MA, USA: Elsevier. doi: 10.1016/B978-0-444-53730-0.00022-1

  • Avérous, Luc R. and Halley, Peter J. (2014). Starch polymers: from the field to industrial products. Starch Polymers: From Genetic Engineering to Green Applications. (pp. 3-10) edited by Peter J. Halley and Luc R. Avérous. Burlington, MA, USA: Elsevier. doi: 10.1016/B978-0-444-53730-0.00018-X

  • Nikolić, Melissa A. L., Dean, Katherine and Halley, Peter J. (2012). Biodegradation and applications of nanobiocomposites. Environmental silicate nano-biocomposites. (pp. 409-422) edited by Luc Avérous and Eric Pollet. London, United Kingdom: Springer. doi: 10.1007/978-1-4471-4108-2_16

  • Halley, Peter J. (2012). Rheology of thermosets: the use of chemorheology to characterise and model thermoset flow behaviour. Thermosets: structure, properties and applications. (pp. 92-117) edited by Qipeng Guo. New Delhi, India: Woodhead Publishing. doi: 10.1533/9780857097637.1.92

  • Chaleat, C. M., Nikolic, M., Truss, R. W., Tan, I., McGlashan, S. A. and Halley, P. J. (2012). Thermoplastic starch polymer blends and nanocomposites. Biobased monomers, polymers and materials. (pp. 323-334) Washington, DC, United States: American Chemical Society. doi: 10.1021/bk-2012-1105.ch019

  • Xie, Fengwei, Halley, Peter J. and Averous, Luc (2011). Bio-nanocomposites based on starch. Nanocomposites with biodegradable polymers: Synthesis, properties and future perspectives. (pp. 234-260) edited by Vikas Mittal. New York, United States: Oxford University Press. doi: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199581924.001.0001

  • McCrossan, K., McClory, C., Mayoral, B., Thompson, D., McConnell, D., McNally, T., Murphy, M., Nicholson, T., Martin, D. and Halley, P. (2011). Composites of poly(ethylene terephthalate) and multi-walled carbon nanotubes. Polymer–carbon nanotube composites: preparation, properties and applications. (pp. 545-586) edited by Tony McNally and Petra Pötschke. Oxford, United Kingdom: Woodhead Publishing. doi: 10.1533/9780857091390.2.545

  • Halley, Peter J. (2010). Morphology development in thermoset nanocomposites. Optimization of polymer nanocomposite properties. (pp. 21-40) edited by Vikas Mittal. Weinheim, Germany: Wiley-V C H Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA. doi: 10.1002/9783527629275.ch2

  • Halley, Peter J. and George, Graeme A. (2009). Physics and dynamics of reactive polymers. Physics and dynamics of reactive polymers. (pp. 169-194) CAMBRIDGE: CAMBRIDGE UNIV PRESS. doi: 10.1017/CBO9780511581403.003

  • Halley, Peter J., Truss, Rowan W., Markotsis, Martin G., Chaleat, Celine, Russo, Melissa, Sargent, Anna Lisa, Tan, Ihwa and Sopade, Peter A. (2007). A review of biodegradable thermoplastic starch polymers. Polymer Durability and Radiation Effects. (pp. 287-300) edited by M. C. Celina and R. A. Assink. United States: American Chemical Society. doi: 10.1021/bk-2007-0978.ch024

  • Cichero, Julie and Halley, Peter (2006). Variations to the normal swallow. Dysphagia: Foundation, theory and practice. (pp. 47-91) edited by Julie Cichero and Bruce Murdoch. Chichester: John Wiley & Sons.

  • Halley, P. J. (2005). Thermoplastic starch biodegradable polymers. Biodegradable polymers for industrial applications. (pp. 140-162) edited by Ray Smith. Boca Raton, Fla. ; Cambridge, England: CRC Press; Woodhead.

  • Sopade, P. A., Bhandari, B. R., D'Arcy, B. R., Halley, P. J. and Caffin, N. A. (2002). A study of vitrification of Australian honeys at different moisture contents. Amorphous Food and Pharmacentical Systems. (pp. 168-183) edited by Harry Levine. UK: Royal Society of Chemistry.

Journal Article

Conference Publication

Edited Outputs

  • Sopade, P. A., Halley, P. J. and Jumming, L.M. eds. (2002). Viscoelastic property of starchhoney Systems during gelatinisation. Innovations in Food Processing Technology and Engineering, Bangkok, 11-13 December. Bangkok, Thailand: Food Engineering and Bioprocess Technology Program Thailand.

Other Outputs

Grants (Administered at UQ)

PhD and MPhil Supervision

Current Supervision

  • Doctor Philosophy — Associate Advisor

Completed Supervision

Possible Research Projects

Note for students: The possible research projects listed on this page may not be comprehensive or up to date. Always feel free to contact the staff for more information, and also with your own research ideas.

  • Part of ARC Linkage grant with Dr Paul Luckman and Dr Brenton Fletcher

  • with Dr Brenton Fletcher