Dr Brooke Ryan

Postdoctoral Res Fellow in Speech

School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences
Faculty of Health and Behavioural Sciences
brooke.ryan@uq.edu.au
+61 7 336 51380

Overview

Brooke Ryan is a speech pathologist who primarily works in aphasia rehabilitation. Her research interests focus on understanding the impact of aphasia and improving psychosocial outcomes for people with aphasia and their families. She currently holds a postdoctoral fellowship to evaluate a novel aphasia intervention aimed at preventing depression.

Qualifications

  • Doctor of Philosophy, The University of Queensland
  • Bachelor of Speech Pathology (Honours), The University of Queensland

Publications

View all Publications

Grants

View all Grants

Supervision

  • Doctor Philosophy

  • Master Philosophy

  • (2018) Doctor Philosophy

View all Supervision

Available Projects

  • Stroke is a leading cause of death and acquired disability worldwide. The effects of stroke can be far-reaching, with physical, cognitive, language and/or emotional difficulties faced by many stroke survivors. However, the impact of stroke is not limited to the stroke survivor; family members can also experience disability as a consequence of a relative’s health condition. The sudden and unexpected nature of stroke means that families are often unprepared for the resulting disruptions in family dynamics and may find themselves in roles they are not prepared for. With a rising increase in overall stroke incidence in young adults (>55 years) , it is likely that stroke-related third-party disability will be continued to be felt amongst young families, including children of parents with stroke. This project will seek to address research questions such as:

    • What is known about the psychological/emotional impact/outcomes of parental stroke on children and adolescents?
    • Is parental stroke associated with an increased risk of psychosocial//emotional difficulties amongst children and adolescents?
    • What factors predict children’s psychological functioning after their parent suffers a stroke?

View all Available Projects

Publications

Book Chapter

  • Hersh, Deborah, Worrall, Linda, O'Halloran, Robyn, Brown, Kyla, Grohn, Brooke and Rodriguez, Amy D. (2013). Assess for success: evidence for therapeutic assessment. In Nina Simmons-Mackie, Julia M King and David R Beukelman (Ed.), Supporting Communication for Adults with Acute and Chronic Aphasia (pp. 145-164) Baltimore, MA, United States: Brookes Publishing.

Journal Article

Conference Publication

Other Outputs

Grants (Administered at UQ)

PhD and MPhil Supervision

Current Supervision

  • Doctor Philosophy — Principal Advisor

  • Master Philosophy — Principal Advisor

    Other advisors:

  • Doctor Philosophy — Associate Advisor

Completed Supervision

Possible Research Projects

Note for students: The possible research projects listed on this page may not be comprehensive or up to date. Always feel free to contact the staff for more information, and also with your own research ideas.

  • Stroke is a leading cause of death and acquired disability worldwide. The effects of stroke can be far-reaching, with physical, cognitive, language and/or emotional difficulties faced by many stroke survivors. However, the impact of stroke is not limited to the stroke survivor; family members can also experience disability as a consequence of a relative’s health condition. The sudden and unexpected nature of stroke means that families are often unprepared for the resulting disruptions in family dynamics and may find themselves in roles they are not prepared for. With a rising increase in overall stroke incidence in young adults (>55 years) , it is likely that stroke-related third-party disability will be continued to be felt amongst young families, including children of parents with stroke. This project will seek to address research questions such as:

    • What is known about the psychological/emotional impact/outcomes of parental stroke on children and adolescents?
    • Is parental stroke associated with an increased risk of psychosocial//emotional difficulties amongst children and adolescents?
    • What factors predict children’s psychological functioning after their parent suffers a stroke?