Professor David Hume

Professor

Mater Research Institute-UQ
Faculty of Medicine

Affiliate Professorial Res Fellow

Institute for Molecular Bioscience
david.hume@uq.edu.au
+61 7 3443 7315

Overview

The research interests of the Hume Laboratory centre on the biology of macrophages and osteoclasts. These are cells of haematopoietic origin that are closely related to each other but have distinctly different activities.

David Hume was a group leader at the Institute for Molecular Bioscience (1988-2007) and subsequently Director of the Roslin Institute at the University of Edinburgh in Scotland from 2007-2017. He is currently a Professorial Research Fellow at the Mater Research Institute-UQ, located at the Translational Research Institute

Research Interests

  • Macrophages Biology
    Professor David Hume is a Professorial Research Fellow at the Mater Research Institute-UQ located at the Translational Research Institute. He was previously Director of The Roslin Institute at the University of Edinburgh (2007-2017). From 1988-2007, he was at the Institute for Molecular Bioscience at the University of Queensland, serving as Deputy Director of the CRC for Chronic Inflammatory Diseases, and Director of the ARC Special Centre for Functional and Applied Genomics. At Mater, David co-leads the Macrophage Biology Research Group with Dr Kate Irvine. He has authored over 450 scientific publications and has supervised more than 55 PhD graduates. He is an international authority in genome sciences, with a particular focus on the function of macrophages—specialised cells of the immune system involved in innate immunity against infections, inflammatory disease and cancer. David’s research focusses on macrophages in normal growth, development and physiology, infectious disease resistance and progression and complications of inflammation. His lab investigates mechanisms that regulate the biological functions of macrophages and explores avenues to boost their normal function and/or limit the damage they cause in inflammatory and infectious diseases. He is also interested in the genetic variations in macrophage function between individuals that contribute to susceptibility to inflammatory and infectious diseases. David has been elected to Fellowships in the Royal Society of Edinburgh, the UK Academy of Medical Sciences and the Royal Society of Biology. Since 2000, he has been a leading member of the FANTOM Consortium, which has made extensive contributions to mammalian genome and transcriptome annotation. David has a 35 year track record of attracting major strategic funding (CRC for Chronic Inflammatory Disease, ARC Special Research Centre in Australia; BBSRC Institute Strategic Programmes, Wellcome Trust Centres, UK Agritech Centre and Bill and Melinda Gates Centre Foundation in the UK) as well as continuous research project funding from NHMRC, ARC, BBSRC, MRC and the Wellcome Trust. "I trained as a metabolic biochemist at the Australian National University, and was very fortunate to have a great mentor in Dr Maurie Weidemann. Throughout my career, I have tried to mentor others with the same level of enthusiasm and support given to me. Being a biological scientist in the early 21st century is very much like being a physical scientist in the early 20th century. Each day brings new technologies and completely unexpected discoveries. I believe that the most novel breakthroughs and advances in human medicine and biotechnology come from basic discovery science, and fundamental understanding of macrophage biology has been my research focus for the whole of my career. That said, the applications of that understanding to human disease are clear, especially in the areas of tissue repair and regenerative medicine, and I am committed to pursuing those applications to benefit patients."

Qualifications

  • Master of Arts, Oxf.
  • PhD, Australian National University
  • BSc(Hons), Australian National University

Publications

  • Patkar, Omkar L., Mohamed, Abdalla Z., Narayanan, Ashwin, Mardon, Karine, Cowin, Gary, Bhalla, Rajiv, Stimson, Damion H. R., Kassiou, Michael, Beecher, Kate, Belmer, Arnauld, Alvarez Cooper, Ignatius, Morgan, Michael, Hume, David A., Irvine, Katharine M., Bartlett, Selena E., Nasrallah, Fatima and Cumming, Paul (2021). A binge high sucrose diet provokes systemic and cerebral inflammation in rats without inducing obesity. Scientific Reports, 11 (1) 11252. doi: 10.1038/s41598-021-90817-z

  • Grapotte, Mathys, Saraswat, Manu, Bessière, Chloé, Menichelli, Christophe, Ramilowski, Jordan A., Severin, Jessica, Hayashizaki, Yoshihide, Itoh, Masayoshi, Tagami, Michihira, Murata, Mitsuyoshi, Kojima-Ishiyama, Miki, Noma, Shohei, Noguchi, Shuhei, Kasukawa, Takeya, Hasegawa, Akira, Suzuki, Harukazu, Nishiyori-Sueki, Hiromi, Frith, Martin C., Abugessaisa, Imad, Aitken, Stuart, Aken, Bronwen L., Alam, Intikhab, Alam, Tanvir, Alasiri, Rami, Alhendi, Ahmad M. N., Alinejad-Rokny, Hamid, Alvarez, Mariano J., Andersson, Robin, Arakawa, Takahiro ... Lecellier, Charles-Henri (2021). Discovery of widespread transcription initiation at microsatellites predictable by sequence-based deep neural network. Nature Communications, 12 (1) 3297. doi: 10.1038/s41467-021-23143-7

  • Psifidi, Androniki, Kranis, Andreas, Rothwell, Lisa M., Bremner, Abi, Russell, Kay, Robledo, Diego, Bush, Stephen J., Fife, Mark, Hocking, Paul M., Banos, Georgios, Hume, David A., Kaufman, Jim, Bailey, Richard A., Avendano, Santiago, Watson, Kellie A., Kaiser, Pete and Stevens, Mark. P. (2021). Quantitative trait loci and transcriptome signatures associated with avian heritable resistance to Campylobacter. Scientific Reports, 11 (1) 1623. doi: 10.1038/s41598-020-79005-7

View all Publications

Grants

View all Grants

Supervision

  • Doctor Philosophy

  • Doctor Philosophy

  • Doctor Philosophy

View all Supervision

Available Projects

  • This project is associated with a successful ARC Discovery Grant and builds upon the discovery that mutation in the CSF1R gene, which controls the deveelopment of macrophages, has severe impacts on postnatal growth and organ development (See paper below). The phenotype can be reversed by transfer of wild-type bone marrow. The PhD project will focus on analysing the precose mechanisms that enable transplanted macrophages to restore normal development. It will develop a wide range of skills in the braod areas of cell and developmental biology, genomics and bioinformatics.

    Enquiries to david.hume@uq.edu.au or Katharine.Irvine@uq.edu.au

    Keshvari S, Caruso M, Teakle N, Batoon L, Sehgal A, Patkar OL, Ferrari-Cestari M, Snell CE, Chen C, Stevenson A, Davis FM, Bush SJ, Pridans C, Summers KM, Pettit AR, Irvine KM, Hume DA.

    CSF1R-dependent macrophages control postnatal somatic growth and organ maturation. PLoS Genet. 2021 Jun 3;17(6):e1009605. doi: 10.1371/journal.pgen.1009605. Online ahead of print.PMID: 34081701

View all Available Projects

Publications

Book

  • Eichmann, Klaus, Avery, Oswald T., Baltimore, David, Von Behring, Emil, Benacerraf, Baruj, Bloor, David, Bordet, Jules J.B.V., Bona, Constantin A., Boyse, Edward A., Burnet, F. Macfarlane, Cantor, Harvey, Cazenave, Pierre A., Claman, Henry N., Cohn, Melvin, Coutinho, Antonio, Davis, Mark M., Crick, Francis H., Dobzhansky, Theodosius G., Doherty, Peter C., Eco, Umberto, Edelman, Gerald M., Ehrlich, Paul, Feyerabend, Paul, Fleck, Ludwik, Fujimura, Joan, Gershon, Richard K., Germain, Ronald N., Gowans, James L., Greene, Mark I. ... Zinkernagel, Rolf M. (2008). The network collective: Rise and fall of a scientific paradigm. Birkhauser Verlag AG. doi: 10.1007/978-3-7643-8373-2

Book Chapter

  • Hume, David A., Summers, Kim M. and Rehli, Michael (2017). Transcriptional regulation and macrophage differentiation. Myeloid Cells in Health and Disease: A Synthesis. (pp. 119-139) wiley. doi: 10.1128/9781555819194.ch8

  • Hume, David A., Schroder, Kate and Irvine, Katharine M. (2009). The impact of CAGE data on understanding macrophage transcriptional biology. Cap-Analysis Gene Expression (CAGE): The Science of Decoding Genes Transcription. (pp. 227-243) Pan Stanford Publishing Pte. Ltd.. doi: 10.4032/9789814241359

  • Hume, D. A., Irvine, K. M. and Schroder, K. (2009). The impact of CAGE data on the understanding of macrophage transcriptional biology. Cap- Analysis Gene Expression (Cage): The Science of Decoding Gene Transcription. (pp. 227-244) edited by Piero Carninci. Singapore: Pan Stanford Publishing.

  • Robin, G., Cowieson, N.P., Guncar, G., Forwood, J.K., Listwan, P., Hume, D.A., Kobe, B., Martin, J.L. and Huber, T.L. (2008). A general target selection method for crystallographic proteomics. Structural Proteomics: High-Throughput Methods. (pp. 27-35) edited by Kobe, B., Guss, M. and Huber, T.L.. Totowa, NJ, United States: Humana Press. doi: 10.1007/978-1-60327-058-8_2

  • Cowieson, N. P., Wensley, B., Robin, G., Guncar, G., Forwood, J. K., Hume, D. A., Kobe, B. and Martin, J. L. (2008). A medium or high throughput protein refolding assay. Structural Proteomics: High throughput Methods. (pp. 269-275) edited by Bostjan Kobe, Mitchell Guss and Thomas Huber. Totowa, NJ, United States: Humana Press. doi: 10.1007/978-1-60327-058-8_17

  • Meng, Weining, Forwood, Jade K., Guncar, Gregor, Robin, Gautier, Cowieson, Nathan P., Listwan, Pawel, Mouradov, Dmitri, King, Gordon, Ross, lan L., Robinson, Jodie, Puri, Munish, Hill, Justine M., Kellie, Stuart, Huber, Thomas, Hume, David A., Martin, Jennifer L. and Kobe, Bostjan (2008). Overview of the pipeline for structural and functional characterization of macrophage proteins at the University of Queensland. Structural proteomics: High-throughput methods. (pp. 577-587) edited by B. Kobe, M. Guss and T. L. Huber. Totowa, NJ, United States: Humana Press.

  • Mouradov, Dmitri, King. Gordon, Ross, Ian L., Forwood, Jade K., Hume, David A., Sinz, Andrea, Martin, Jennifer L., Kobe, Bostjan and Huber, Thomas L. (2008). Protein structure determination using a combination of cross-linking, mass spectrometry, and molecular modeling. Structural Proteomics: High Throughput Methods. (pp. 459-474) edited by Bostjan Kobe, Mitchell Guss and Thomas L. Huber. Totowa, NJ, United States: Humana Press. doi: 10.1007/978-1-60327-058-8_31

  • Hume, David A., Wells, Christine A. and Ravasi, Timothy (2007). Transcriptional Regulatory Networks in Macrophages. Decoding the Genomic Control of Immune Reactions. (pp. 2-24) Chichester, UK: wiley. doi: 10.1002/9780470062128.ch2

  • Ravasi, T. and Hume, D. A. (2005). Noncoding RNA's in mammals. Encyclopedia of Genetics, Genomics, Proteomics and Bioformatics. (pp. xx-xx) edited by Michael J. Dunn, Lynn B. Jorde, Peter F. R. Little and Shankar Subramaniam. USA: John Wiley & Sons, Inc.. doi: 10.1002/047001153X.g203204

  • Sasmono, R.T. and Hume, D. A. (2004). The Biology of Macrophages. The Innate Immune Response to Infection. (pp. 71-94) edited by Kaufmann, SE.; Medzhitov, R.; Gordon and S.. Washington, DC, USA: ASM Press.

  • Stacey, K. J., Sester, D. P., Naik, S., Roberts, T., Sweet, M. J. and Hume, D. A. (2002). Phosphorothioate backbone modification changes the pattern of responses to CpG. Microbial DNA and host immunity. (pp. 63-77) Totowa, New Jersey: Humana Press. doi: 10.1007/978-1-59259-305-7_6

  • Hume, D. A., Stacey, K. J., Cassady, A. ., Browne, C. M., Sweet, M. J. and Bertoncello, I. (1996). Growth and differentiation of murine macrophages. Handbook of experimental immunology. (pp. 160.1-160.10) Boston: Wiley-Blackwell.

  • Stacey, K. J., Cassady, A. I., Nimmo, K. A., Murphy, K. M., von der Ahe, D., Pearson, D., Botteri, F., Nagamine, Y. and Hume, D. A. (1992). The regulation of urokinase plasminogen activator gene expression in macrophages. Mononuclear Phagocytes: Biology of Monocytes and Macrophages. (pp. 233-240) edited by van Furth, R.. Dordrecht , Netherlands: Kluwer Academic Publishers. doi: 10.1007/978-94-015-8070-0

Journal Article

Conference Publication

Other Outputs

  • Irvine, Katharine, Hume, David and Sehgal, Anuj (2020). CSF1R_FRed_SupplementaryVideos. The University of Queensland. (Dataset) doi: 10.14264/8c6d4ba

Grants (Administered at UQ)

PhD and MPhil Supervision

Current Supervision

  • Doctor Philosophy — Principal Advisor

    Other advisors:

  • Doctor Philosophy — Principal Advisor

    Other advisors:

  • Doctor Philosophy — Principal Advisor

  • Doctor Philosophy — Principal Advisor

  • Master Philosophy — Associate Advisor

Completed Supervision

Possible Research Projects

Note for students: The possible research projects listed on this page may not be comprehensive or up to date. Always feel free to contact the staff for more information, and also with your own research ideas.

  • This project is associated with a successful ARC Discovery Grant and builds upon the discovery that mutation in the CSF1R gene, which controls the deveelopment of macrophages, has severe impacts on postnatal growth and organ development (See paper below). The phenotype can be reversed by transfer of wild-type bone marrow. The PhD project will focus on analysing the precose mechanisms that enable transplanted macrophages to restore normal development. It will develop a wide range of skills in the braod areas of cell and developmental biology, genomics and bioinformatics.

    Enquiries to david.hume@uq.edu.au or Katharine.Irvine@uq.edu.au

    Keshvari S, Caruso M, Teakle N, Batoon L, Sehgal A, Patkar OL, Ferrari-Cestari M, Snell CE, Chen C, Stevenson A, Davis FM, Bush SJ, Pridans C, Summers KM, Pettit AR, Irvine KM, Hume DA.

    CSF1R-dependent macrophages control postnatal somatic growth and organ maturation. PLoS Genet. 2021 Jun 3;17(6):e1009605. doi: 10.1371/journal.pgen.1009605. Online ahead of print.PMID: 34081701