Associate Professor Alina Morawska

Deputy Director (Research)

School of Psychology
Faculty of Health and Behavioural Sciences
alina@psy.uq.edu.au
+61 7 336 57304

Overview

A/Prof Alina Morawska is the Deputy Director (Research) at the Parenting and Family Support Centre, The University of Queensland. Her research focuses on behavioural family intervention as a means for promoting positive family relationships, and the prevention and early intervention for young children at risk of developing behavioural and emotional problems. In particular, her focus is on improving the health and overall wellbeing of children and families. She completed her PhD in Clinical Psychology at the University of Queensland in 2004, for which she received the Australian Psychological Society's Excellent PhD Thesis in Psychology Award. She has published extensively in the field of parenting and family intervention and has received numerous grants to support her research. She is a Director of the Australian Association for Cognitive and Behaviour Therapy Ltd.

Qualifications

  • Masters of Public Health, Queensland University of Technology
  • Doctor of Philosophy, The University of Queensland
  • Bachelor of Science (Hons) Psychology, The University of Queensland
  • Bachelor of Arts, The University of Queensland

Publications

View all Publications

Supervision

  • Doctor Philosophy

  • Doctor Philosophy

  • Doctor Philosophy

View all Supervision

Available Projects

  • Gender role stereotypes play an important role in all areas of human development. They affect our emotions, choices, and behaviours in multiple contexts, and set the stage for prejudice and discrimination. While adult gender roles may have changed over the last few decades, most children are exposed to a continuing barrage of stereotyped gender roles from birth: from parents, the media, and peers, and these stereotypes have not changed significantly over time. Many parents express an interest in raising their children in a way that deemphasizes gender, yet there no existing evidence-based approaches focused on minimising the effects of gender role stereotypes in early childhood. This research aims to:

    • Provide a longitudinal description of the early home environment and its influence on infants’ gendered development, with a particular emphasis on the role of parents and specific parenting strategies.
    • Assess the efficacy and mechanisms of change of a brief parenting program delivered prenatally in promoting an early learning environment that deemphasises the role of gender via a randomised controlled trial evaluating proximal program outcomes in the first year of life.
  • Parents’ ability to guide their children in developing ‘healthy habits’ is key to supporting children’s short- and long-term health and wellbeing. Establishing healthy behaviours in early childhood can lay the foundation for a lifetime of healthy habits and may have greater impact on long-term health than attempting to change entrenched adult behaviour. This program of research aims to establish the key facilitators and barriers to for children and their parents to engaging in healthy habits, and evaluate interventions to promote the development of early health behaviours in young children.

View all Available Projects

Publications

Book Chapter

  • Morawska, Alina and Mitchell, Amy E. (2018). Children's health, physical activity, and nutrition. Handbook of parenting and child development across the lifespan. (pp. 289-311) edited by Matthew R. Sanders and Alina Morawska. Cham, Switzerland: Springer International Publishing. doi: 10.1007/978-3-319-94598-9_13

  • Sanders, Matthew R. and Morawska, Alina (2018). Future directions for research, policy, and practice. Handbook of parenting and child development across the lifespan. (pp. 821-831) edited by Matthew R. Sanders and Alina Morawska. Cham, Switzerland: Springer International Publishing. doi: 10.1007/978-3-319-94598-9_36

  • Sanders, Matthew R. and Morawska, Alina (2018). Towards an evidence-based population approach to supporting parenting in the early years. Transforming infant wellbeing: research, policy and practice for the first 1001 critical days. (pp. 163-174) edited by Penelope Leach. Abington, Oxfordshire, United Kingdom: Routledge. doi: 10.4324/9781315452890

  • Morawska, Alina and Sanders, Matthew R. (2017). Measuring Child, Parent, and Family Outcomes at Individual and Population Levels. The Power of Positive Parenting: Transforming the Lives of Children, Parents, and Communities Using the Triple P System. (pp. 395-404) edited by Sanders, Matthew R. and Mazzucchelli, Trevor G.. New York, NY United States: Oxford University Press. doi: 10.1093/med-psych/9780190629069.003.0036

  • Sanders, Matthew and Morawska, Alina (2016). Parenting and the health and well-being of children and adolescents. Psychosocial dimensions of medicine. (pp. 151-163) edited by Jennifer Fitzgerald and Gerard J. Byrne. Research, VIC, Australia: IP Communications.

  • Morawska, Alina and Sanders, Matthew (2011). Disorders of childhood. Abnormal psychology: Leading researcher perspectives. (pp. 379-418) edited by Elizabeth Rieger. North Ryde, NSW, Australia: McGraw-Hill Australia.

  • Sanders, Matthew R. and Morawska, Alina (2010). Prevention: the role of early universal and targeted interventions. Clinical handbook of assessing and treating conduct problems in youth. (pp. 435-454) edited by Rachael C. Murrihy, Antony D. Kidman and Thomas H. Ollendick. New York, United States: Springer Verlag. doi: 10.1007/978-1-4419-6297-3_17

  • Morawska, Alina and Sanders, Matthew R. (2008). Disorders of Childhood. Abnormal Psychology: Leading Researcher Perspectives. (pp. 380-420) edited by Rieger, E.. Australia: McGraw-Hill Australia Pty Ltd.

  • Sanders, M. R. and Morawska, A. (2005). Can changing parental knowledge, dysfunctional expectations and attributions, and emotion regulation improve outcomes for children?. Encyclopedia on Early Childhood Development. (pp. 1-12) edited by Richard E. Tremblay, Ronald G. Barr and Ray de V. Peters. Montreal, Quebec: Centre of Excellence of Early Childhood Development.

Journal Article

Conference Publication

Edited Outputs

Other Outputs

Grants (Administered at UQ)

PhD and MPhil Supervision

Current Supervision

  • Doctor Philosophy — Principal Advisor

  • Doctor Philosophy — Principal Advisor

  • Doctor Philosophy — Principal Advisor

    Other advisors:

  • Doctor Philosophy — Principal Advisor

  • Doctor Philosophy — Principal Advisor

  • Doctor Philosophy — Associate Advisor

    Other advisors:

Completed Supervision

Possible Research Projects

Note for students: The possible research projects listed on this page may not be comprehensive or up to date. Always feel free to contact the staff for more information, and also with your own research ideas.

  • Gender role stereotypes play an important role in all areas of human development. They affect our emotions, choices, and behaviours in multiple contexts, and set the stage for prejudice and discrimination. While adult gender roles may have changed over the last few decades, most children are exposed to a continuing barrage of stereotyped gender roles from birth: from parents, the media, and peers, and these stereotypes have not changed significantly over time. Many parents express an interest in raising their children in a way that deemphasizes gender, yet there no existing evidence-based approaches focused on minimising the effects of gender role stereotypes in early childhood. This research aims to:

    • Provide a longitudinal description of the early home environment and its influence on infants’ gendered development, with a particular emphasis on the role of parents and specific parenting strategies.
    • Assess the efficacy and mechanisms of change of a brief parenting program delivered prenatally in promoting an early learning environment that deemphasises the role of gender via a randomised controlled trial evaluating proximal program outcomes in the first year of life.
  • Parents’ ability to guide their children in developing ‘healthy habits’ is key to supporting children’s short- and long-term health and wellbeing. Establishing healthy behaviours in early childhood can lay the foundation for a lifetime of healthy habits and may have greater impact on long-term health than attempting to change entrenched adult behaviour. This program of research aims to establish the key facilitators and barriers to for children and their parents to engaging in healthy habits, and evaluate interventions to promote the development of early health behaviours in young children.