Associate Professor Mansour Edraki

Principal Research Fellow

Centre for Mined Land Rehabilitation
Sustainable Minerals Institute
m.edraki@cmlr.uq.edu.au
+61 7 334 64060

Overview

Dr Mansour Edraki is a geo-environmental scientist specialising in the field of inorganic geochemistry. He joined UQ in 2000 following completion of his PhD at University of New England. Prior to that, and before immigrating to Australia in mid 1990s, he was a lecturer in earth sciences. Since joining UQ, Dr Edraki has focused on developing innovative techniques for understanding and predicting geochemical processes which underpin sustainable management of mine waste and mine water, particularly acid and metalliferous drainage. Mansour’s research has direct applications for the resources and energy industries and the impact of his work is evident in a continuous flow of industry-funded projects in the last decade. Dr Edraki has initiated research collaborations in many international locations including Indonesia (South Kalimantan and Freeport), Iran (Mehdiabad Zinc) Papua New Guinea (Ok Tedi), Philippines (USEP and Mindanao Development Authority), Korea (MIRECO and KIGAM), Peru (INGEMET), and Chile (Fundación Chile, Universidad de Concepción). He is currently coordinating the ‘Environment, Tailings and Water’ line of SMI’s International Centre of Excellence in Chile (SMI-ICE Chile). Dr Edraki represents SMI-UQ at International Network for Acid Prevention (INAP), which is a global alliance for managing the issue of acid and metalliferous drainage.

Research Interests

  • ********************
    Dr Mansour Edraki’s research interest is in understanding and predicting the source, transformations and fate of contaminants, particularly acid and metalliferous drainage (AMD), in the mining environment. Through field monitoring, laboratory experiments and modelling he follows the geochemical pathways of heavy metals, metalloids (e.g. arsenic) and salts and investigates the natural processes that may degrade the quality of surface and groundwater and natural soils. Mansour uses that knowledge to quantify the extent of the current and future effects of those processes for optimum remediation and rehabilitation outcomes. Specific areas of research include: Geochemical effects of clay minerals on deposition, dewatering and rehabilitation of tailings; Formation and stability of secondary minerals and amorphous phases and their role in natural attenuation of metals (and metalloids) and remediation of mine tailings and associated seepage; Novel techniques for characterisation and prediction of AMD including development of kinetic leaching procedures; Applications of stable isotope techniques in AMD investigations; A life cycle approach to managing mine tailings – Designer Tailings; and Unlocking the value of mining wastes and eliminating residual risks through reprocessing, recycling, reuse and remediation.

Qualifications

  • BCHPGD, The University of Queensland
  • B Sc, Shiraz University
  • M Sc, Shiraz University
  • PhD, University of New England

Publications

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Grants

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Supervision

  • Master Philosophy

  • Doctor Philosophy

  • Doctor Philosophy

View all Supervision

Available Projects

  • Acid mine drainage (AMD) is a major global environmental, health and safety issue. It forms when waste rock from mining operations is exposed to air and water, forming a highly acidic and toxic solution containing high concentrations of dissolved heavy metals and sulfate. Passivating pyrite rock involves altering the surface of the rock to prevent the (bio)geochemical processes which cause AMD to form. This type of prevention strategy forms a physical barrier on the rock preventing exposure to water, air and/or microorganisms. The project objective is to develop a novel chemical surface coating strategy to passivate pyrite. The candidate should have an interest in mine site remediation and geochemistry. The project will involve a literature review, laboratory work and data analysis. This project has both industry and academic involvement. The successful candidate will be based at the Sustainable Minerals Institute in the Centre of Mined Land Rehabilitation, on a joint project in collaboration with the company Kinetic Group Worldwide. There is the potential for ongoing employment opportunities with Kinetic Group Worldwide on the successful completion of this project.

    New project posted 13/07/2018

    Investigating the effectiveness of pit wall covers for acid mine drainage control

    Acid mine drainage (AMD) is a common problem in the mining sector, which can potentially affect the environment. AMD is the outflow of acidic water from metal or coal mines, due to oxidation of sulfide-containing rocks in the presence of water and air. Spraying sealing materials to cover walls in open pit mines is a method to control AMD. The development and selection of the right material requires laboratory tests and field trials, with careful consideration of the various parameters that affect AMD generation. The project objective is to determine the long-term effectiveness of new types of cover sprayed onto potential acid forming pit wall exposures in preventing AMD. The project includes conducting a literature review, laboratory testing, potential field trials, and data analysis. The outcome of this project will have significant economic and environmental benefits. The successful candidate will work in a multidisciplinary team of researchers at the Centre of Mined Land Rehabilitation, Sustainable Minerals Institute.

View all Available Projects

Publications

Featured Publications

Book Chapter

Journal Article

Conference Publication

Other Outputs

Grants (Administered at UQ)

PhD and MPhil Supervision

Current Supervision

  • Master Philosophy — Principal Advisor

  • Doctor Philosophy — Principal Advisor

  • Doctor Philosophy — Principal Advisor

    Other advisors:

  • Doctor Philosophy — Principal Advisor

  • Doctor Philosophy — Principal Advisor

    Other advisors:

  • Doctor Philosophy — Joint Principal Advisor

  • Master Philosophy — Associate Advisor

    Other advisors:

  • Doctor Philosophy — Associate Advisor

  • Doctor Philosophy — Associate Advisor

    Other advisors:

  • Doctor Philosophy — Associate Advisor

Completed Supervision

Possible Research Projects

Note for students: The possible research projects listed on this page may not be comprehensive or up to date. Always feel free to contact the staff for more information, and also with your own research ideas.

  • Acid mine drainage (AMD) is a major global environmental, health and safety issue. It forms when waste rock from mining operations is exposed to air and water, forming a highly acidic and toxic solution containing high concentrations of dissolved heavy metals and sulfate. Passivating pyrite rock involves altering the surface of the rock to prevent the (bio)geochemical processes which cause AMD to form. This type of prevention strategy forms a physical barrier on the rock preventing exposure to water, air and/or microorganisms. The project objective is to develop a novel chemical surface coating strategy to passivate pyrite. The candidate should have an interest in mine site remediation and geochemistry. The project will involve a literature review, laboratory work and data analysis. This project has both industry and academic involvement. The successful candidate will be based at the Sustainable Minerals Institute in the Centre of Mined Land Rehabilitation, on a joint project in collaboration with the company Kinetic Group Worldwide. There is the potential for ongoing employment opportunities with Kinetic Group Worldwide on the successful completion of this project.

    New project posted 13/07/2018

    Investigating the effectiveness of pit wall covers for acid mine drainage control

    Acid mine drainage (AMD) is a common problem in the mining sector, which can potentially affect the environment. AMD is the outflow of acidic water from metal or coal mines, due to oxidation of sulfide-containing rocks in the presence of water and air. Spraying sealing materials to cover walls in open pit mines is a method to control AMD. The development and selection of the right material requires laboratory tests and field trials, with careful consideration of the various parameters that affect AMD generation. The project objective is to determine the long-term effectiveness of new types of cover sprayed onto potential acid forming pit wall exposures in preventing AMD. The project includes conducting a literature review, laboratory testing, potential field trials, and data analysis. The outcome of this project will have significant economic and environmental benefits. The successful candidate will work in a multidisciplinary team of researchers at the Centre of Mined Land Rehabilitation, Sustainable Minerals Institute.