Professor Nicholas Aroney

Professor

School of Law
Faculty of Business, Economics and Law
n.aroney@law.uq.edu.au
+61 7 336 53053

Overview

Nicholas Aroney is Professor of Constitutional Law at The University of Queensland. He is also a Fellow of the Centre for Public, International and Comparative Law, a Research Fellow of Emmanuel College at The University of Queensland, a Fellow of the Centre for Law and Religion at Emory University and an External Member of the Islam, Law and Modernity research program at Durham University. In 2010 he received of a four-year Future Fellowship from the Australian Research Council to study comparative federalism. He has held visiting positions at Oxford, Cambridge, Edinburgh, Sydney, Emory and Tilburg universities. Most recently, he was a Visiting Professor of the Institut Michel Villey at the University of Paris II (Panthéon-Assas) and he will be a Visiting Fellow of the Institute of Advanced Study at Durham University in late 2017.

Professor Aroney has published over 100 books, journal articles and book chapters in the fields of constitutional law, comparative constitutional law and legal theory. He has led several international research projects in comparative federalism, bicameralism, legal pluralism, and law & religion, and he speaks frequently at international conferences on these topics. His most notable publications in these fields include: The Constitution of a Federal Commonwealth: The Making and Meaning of the Australian Constitution (Cambridge University Press, 2009), Shari’a in the West (Oxford University Press, 2010) (edited with Rex Ahdar), The Future of Australian Federalism (Cambridge University Press, 2012) (edited with Gabrielle Appleby and Thomas John), The Constitution of the Commonwealth of Australia: History, Principle and Interpretation (Cambridge University Press, 2015) (with Peter Gerangelos, James Stellios and Sarah Murray) and Courts in Federal Countries (Toronto University Press, 2017) (edited with John Kincaid).

He is currently working on a monograph entitled Federal Constitutionalism: Theory, Principle and Practice and an edited volume entitled Christianity and Constitutionalism for Cambridge University Press (with Ian Leigh).

Professor Aroney is a former editor of The University of Queensland Law Journal (2003-2005) and International Trade and Business Law Annual (1996-1998), and a past secretary of the Australian Society of Legal Philosophy. He is a past member of the Governing Council and the current Queensland Convenor of the Australian Association of Constitutional Law. He is also a member of the editorial advisory board of Public Law Review and International Trade and Business Law Review. He has made numerous influential submissions to government inquiries and in 2013 undertook a review of the Crime and Misconduct Act for the Queensland Government with the Hon Ian Callinan AC QC, a former Justice of the High Court of Australia.

Professor Aroney joined the Law School in 1995 after working with a major national law firm and acting as a legal consultant in the field of building and construction law.

Research Interests

  • Australian constitutional law
  • Comparative constitutional law
  • Discrimination
  • Equal opportunity law
  • Federalism
  • Legal history

Qualifications

  • Doctor of Philosophy, Monash University
  • Master of Laws, The University of Queensland
  • Bachelor of Laws (Honours), The University of Queensland
  • Bachelor of Arts, University of New South Wales

Publications

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Supervision

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Publications

Featured Publications

Book

Book Chapter

  • Aroney, Nicholas T. and Kincaid, John (2017). Comparative conclusions. In Courts in federal countries: federalists or unitarists? (pp. 482-540) Toronto, Canada: University of Toronto Press.

  • Aroney, Nicholas T. (2017). Introduction: courts in federal countries. In Courts in federal countries: federalists or unitarists? (pp. 3-28) Toronto, Canada: University of Toronto Press.

  • Aroney, Nicholas , Harrison, Joel and Babie, Paul (2017). Religious freedom under the Victorian Charter of Rights. In Matthew Groves and Colin Campbell (Ed.), Australian Charters of Rights a Decade On (pp. 1-19) Annandale, Australia: Federation Press.

  • Aroney, Nicholas T. (2017). The Federal Condition. In Amnon Lev (Ed.), The Federal Idea: Between Governance and Political Life (pp. 1-1) United Kingdom: Hart Publishing.

  • Aroney, Nicholas T. (2017). The High Court of Australia: Textual Unitarism vs Structural Federalism. In Courts in Federal Countries: Federalists or Unitarists? (pp. 29-68) Toronto: University of Toronto Press.

  • Aroney, Nicholas (2016). Devolutionary federalism within a Westminster-derived context. In Aileen McHarg, Tom Mullen, Alan Page and Neil Walker (Ed.), The Scottish independence referendum: constitutional and political implications (pp. 295-333) Oxford, United Kingdom: Oxford University Press.

  • Aroney, Nicholas and Gautam, Khagesh (2016). Federalism - a selected comparison. In Shaun Star (Ed.), Australia and India: a comparative overview of the law and legal practice (pp. 1-19) Gurgaon, Haryana, India: Universal Law Publishing.

  • Aroney, Nicholas (2016). Types of Federalism. In Rainer Grote, Frauke Lachenmann and Rüdiger Wolfrum (Ed.), Max Planck Encyclopedia of Comparative Constitutional Law (pp. 1-18) Oxford, United Kingdom: Oxford University Press.

  • Aroney, Nicholas T. (2015). On the Distinction Between Law and Convention. In Brian Galligan and Scott Brenton (Ed.), Constitutional Conventions in Westminster Systems: Controversies, Changes and Challenges (pp. 24-50) Melbourne: Cambridge University Press. doi:10.1017/CBO9781316178560.003

  • Aroney, Nicholas T. and Patapan, Haig (2015). The Gibbs Court. In Rosalind Dixon and George Williams (Ed.), The High Court, the Constitution and Australian Politics (pp. 220-243) Port Melbourne, VIC, Australia: Cambridge University Press. doi:10.1017/CBO9781107445253.012

  • Aroney, Nicholas T. (2014). Devolution and the Scottish Independence Referendum: Implications for Federal Theory. In Constitution and Political Implications of the Scottish Referendum (pp. 1-1) Australia: Committee For Economic Development of Australia.

  • Aroney, Nicholas, Bassu, Carla and Popp, Carolyn (2014). Legal transplants in the Australian legal system. In Nicola Lupo and Lucia Scaffardi (Ed.), Comparative law in legislative drafting: the increasing importance of dialogue amongst parliaments (pp. 161-184) The Hauge, Netherlands: Eleven International Publishing.

  • Aroney, Nicholas (2014). Subsidiarity in the writings of Aristotle and Aquinas. In Michelle Evans and Augusto Zimmerman (Ed.), Global perspectives on subsidiarity (pp. 9-27) Dordrecht Netherlands: Springer. doi:10.1007/978-94-017-8810-6_2

  • Aroney, Nicholas (2014). The constitutional first principles of royal commissions. In Scott Prasser and Helen Tracey (Ed.), Royal commissions and public inquiries: practice and potential (pp. 23-35) Ballarat, VIC, Australia: Connor Court Publishing.

  • Aroney, Nicholas T. (2013). Philosophical Origins of Subsidiarity. In Michelle Evans and Augusto Zimmerman (Ed.), International Perspectives on Subsidiarity: Good Governance, Federalism, Democracy and Individual Rights (pp. 1-1) Berlin, Germany: Springer.

  • Appleby, Gabrielle, Aroney, Nicholas and John, Thomas (2012). Australian federalism: Past, present and future tense. In Gabrielle Appleby, Nicholas T. Aroney and Thomas John (Ed.), The future of Australian federalism: Comparative and interdisciplinary perspectives (pp. 1-24) Cambridge, United Kingdom: Cambridge University Press.

  • Aroney, Nicholas T., Prasser, Scott and Taylor, Alison (2012). Federal diversity in Australia – a counter narrative. In Gabrielle Appleby, Nicholas T. Aroney and Thomas John (Ed.), The future of Australian federalism: Comparative and interdisciplinary perspectives (pp. 272-300) Cambridge, United Kingdom: Cambridge University Press.

  • Aroney, Nicholas (2012). Popular ratification of the state constitutions. In Paul Kildea, Andrew Lynch and George Williams (Ed.), Tomorrow's federation: reforming Australian government (pp. 210-226) Annandale, NSW, Australia: Federation Press.

  • Appleby, Gabrielle, Aroney, Nicholas and John, Thomas (2012). Preface. In Gabrielle Appleby, Nicholas Aroney and Thomas John (Ed.), The future of Australian federalism: comparative and interdisciplinary perspectives (pp. xix-xix) Cambridge, United Kingdom: Cambridge University Press.

  • Aroney, Nicholas T. (2011). Bund, Bundesstaat and Staatenbund: The German Element in Australian Federalism. In Jürgen Bröhmer (Ed.), The German Constitution Turns 60 : Basic Law and Commonwealth Constitution, German and Australian Perspectives 1st ed. (pp. 31-53) Frankfurt am Main, Germany: Peter Lang Publishing.

  • Aroney, Nicholas and Miller, Bradley (2011). Finnis on liberty. In Suri Ratnapala and Gabriel A. Moens (Ed.), Jurisprudence of Liberty 2nd ed. (pp. 247-269) Chatswood, NSW, Australia: LexisNexis Butterworths.

  • Aroney, Nicholas T. (2010). Australia. In Luis Moreno and César Colino (Ed.), Diversity and unity in federal countries (pp. 16-46) Montreal, Canada: McGill-Queen's University Press.

  • Aroney, Nicholas T. (2010). Reinvigorating Australian Federalism. In Michael White and Aladin Rahemtula (Ed.), Supreme Court History Program Yearbook 2009 (pp. 75-87) Brisbane, Australia: Supreme Court Library Queensland.

  • Aroney, Nicholas (2010). The people of Queensland and their constitution: re-establishing Queensland's constitution on its own ground. In Michael White and Aladin Rahemtula (Ed.), Queensland's Constitution: Past, present and future (pp. 214-232) Brisbane, Australia: Supreme Court of Queensland Library.

  • Aroney, Nicholas and Ahdar, Rex (2010). The topography of Shari'a in the western political landscape. In Nicholas Aroney and Rex Ahdar (Ed.), Shari'a in the West (pp. 1-31) Oxford, U.K.: Oxford University Press.

  • Aroney, Nicholas T. (2009). Before Federalism? Thomas Aquinas, Jean Quidort and Nicolas Cusanus. In Ann Ward and Lee Ward (Ed.), The Ashgate Research Companion on Federalism (pp. 31-48) London: Ashgate.

  • Aroney, Nicholas T. (2009). The implied rights revolution: Sacrificing means to ends?. In H. P. Lee and Peter Gerangelos (Ed.), Constitutional Advancement in a Frozen Continent: Essays in Honour of George Winterton (pp. 173-188) Sydney: Federation Press.

  • Aroney, Nicholas T. (2008). Bicameralism and representations of democracy. In Nicholas Aroney, Scott Prasser and John Nethercote (Ed.), Restraining Elective Dictatorship: The Upper House Solution? (pp. 20-35) Perth, Australia: University of Western Australia Press.

  • Aroney, Nicholas T. (2008). Unity and Diversity in Federal Australia. In Rupak Chattopadhyay and Abigail Ostien Karos (Ed.), Dialogues on Diversity and Unity in Federal Countries (pp. 10-12) Montreal: McGill-Queen's University Press.

  • Prasser, S., Nethercote, J. R. and Aroney, N. (2008). Upper Houses and the Problem of Elective Dictatorship. In Nicholas Aroney, Scott Prasser and JR Nethercote (Ed.), Restraining Elective Dictatorship: The Upper House Solution? 1st ed. (pp. xv-xxii) Perth Western Australia: University of Western Australia Press.

  • Aroney, Nicholas T. (2006). Thomas McCawley v The King. In George Winterton (Ed.), State Consitutional Landmarks (pp. 69-97) Annandale, NSW, Australia: Federation Press.

  • Aroney, Nicholas T. (2005). Federal constitutionalism: European constitutionalism in comparative perspective. In F. H. van der Burg, A. K. Koekkoek;, voorw. Paul Zoontjens and Hans Peters (Ed.), Getuigend staatsrecht: Liber amicorum A.K. Koekkoek (pp. 229-251) Nijmegen, The Netherlands: Wolf Legal Publishers.

  • Aroney, N. T. (2004). Althusius at the Antipodes: The Politica and Australian Federalism. In Frederick Carney, Heinz Schilling and Dieter Wyduckel (Ed.), Jurisprudenz, Politische Theorie und Politische Theologie 1 ed. (pp. 529-546) Germany: Duncker & Humblot.

  • Aroney, N. T. (2003). Fiscal competition. In Raoul Blindenbacher and Arnold Koller (Ed.), Federalism in a changing world: Learning from each other 1 ed. (pp. 492-501) Montreal: McGill-Queen's University Press.

  • Aroney, N. T. (2003). The Griffith doctrine: Reservation and Immunity. In Dr Michael White; Aladin Rahemtula (Ed.), Queensland Judges on the High Court 1 ed. (pp. 219-254) Brisbane: Supreme Court of Queensland Library.

  • Aroney, N. T. (2002). Griffith's Vision of Australian Federalism. In Dr M. White and A. Rahemtula (Ed.), Sir Samuel Griffith: The law and the constitution 1 ed. (pp. 179-201) NSW: Thomson Lawbook Co.

  • Aroney, N. T. (2001). Implied constitutional rights: Implications & references. In Tony Blackshield, Michael Coper and George Williams (Ed.), The Oxford companion to the high court of Australia (pp. 336-337) Vic: Oxford University Press.

  • Aroney, N. T. (2000). Federal representation and the framers of the Australian Constitution. In G. Moens (Ed.), Constitutional and international law perspectives: Achievements and challenges (pp. 13-53) Brisbane, Queensland: University of Queensland Press.

  • Aroney, N. T. (2000). The freedom of political communication since Lange: Commentary. In A. Stone and G. Williams (Ed.), The High Court in Transition: Essays in Constitutional Law 1st ed. (pp. 21-34) NSW: The Federation Press.

Journal Article

Conference Publication

Other Outputs

PhD and MPhil Supervision

Current Supervision

  • Doctor Philosophy — Principal Advisor

  • Doctor Philosophy — Principal Advisor

  • Doctor Philosophy — Principal Advisor

    Other advisors:

  • Doctor Philosophy — Principal Advisor

  • Doctor Philosophy — Principal Advisor

    Other advisors:

  • Doctor Philosophy — Principal Advisor

  • Doctor Philosophy — Associate Advisor

    Other advisors:

Completed Supervision