Dr Tanya Rose

Lecturer in Speech Pathology

School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences
Faculty of Health and Behavioural Sciences
t.rose@uq.edu.au
+61 7 336 52830

Overview

Tanya is a certified practising speech-language pathologist who has a particular clinical and research interest in both paediatric and adult language. She has experience in conducting mixed-methods studies.

Tanya’s research interests include exploring family-centred models of care and client outcomes using the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health framework when working with young children who are ‘late talkers’ or who have a developmental language delay/disorder and their families. Tanya lectures in paediatric language and paediatric motor speech disorders.

Tanya is also passionate about the provision of accessible health information to adults who have aphasia post-stroke and to their family members. Tanya undertook her doctoral research within the Communication Disability Centre (CDC) at The University of Queensland. As a CDC affiliate she is particularly interested in patient education and ensuring people with aphasia, their family, and friends receive appropriate health information and access to services across the continuum of care.

Research Interests

  • early language development
  • family-centred service provision
  • service evaluation
  • post-stroke aphasia
  • health education

Qualifications

  • Graduate Certificate in Higher Education, The University of Queensland
  • Doctor of Philosophy, The University of Queensland
  • Bachelor of Speech Pathology with Hons Class 1, The University of Queensland

Publications

  • Wallace, Sarah J., Worrall, Linda, Rose, Tanya, Le Dorze, Guylaine, Breitenstein, Caterina, Hilari, Katerina, Babbitt, Edna, Bose, Arpita, Brady, Marian, Cherney, Leora R., Copland, David, Cruice, Madeline, Enderby, Pam, Hersh, Deborah, Howe, Tami, Kelly, Helen, Kiran, Swathi, Laska, Ann-Charlotte, Marshall, Jane, Nicholas, Marjorie, Patterson, Janet, Pearl, Gill, Rochon, Elizabeth, Rose, Miranda, Sage, Karen, Small, Steven and Webster, Janet (2018) A core outcome set for aphasia treatment research: the ROMA consensus statement. International Journal of Stroke, 174749301880620. doi:10.1177/1747493018806200

  • Rose, Tanya A., Balse, Anita, Osmond, Sarah, Poon, Angela, Simons, Natasha and Wallace, Sarah J. (2018) Aphasia education: speech-language pathologists’ perspectives regarding current and optimal practice. Aphasiology, 32 8: 967-988. doi:10.1080/02687038.2018.1472366

  • Clarke, Angela, Meredith, Pamela J., Rose, Tanya A. and Daubney, Michael (2018) A role for epistemic trust in speech-language pathology: A tutorial paper. Journal of Communication Disorders, 72 54-63. doi:10.1016/j.jcomdis.2018.02.004

View all Publications

Supervision

  • Doctor Philosophy

  • Doctor Philosophy

  • Doctor Philosophy

View all Supervision

Available Projects

  • Parent-child interaction therapy is widely used by speech-language pathologists (SLPs) in the treatment of developmental language difficulties. This family-centred intervention involves coaching parents to use language facilitation strategies, such as commenting on their child’s interests. There is currently no standardised tool available for SLPs to rate parents’ use of language facilitation strategies. This project will develop a standardised tool for capturing parents’ use of language facilitation strategies in a clinical context. SLPs require a validated tool to guide intervention and evaluate outcomes of their family-centred SLP service.

  • Family members play a vital role in accessing health information for people with aphasia and have rated information about aphasia as their most important informational need post-stroke. The need for information to be provided to family members proactively and flexibly, particularly in the early period post-stroke has been recognised. This project will focus on developing and evaluating a resource for family members new to living with aphasia, co-developed with family members who have previously journeyed though the early phases of the care-continuum.

View all Available Projects

Publications

Book Chapter

  • Worrall, Linda, Rose, Tanya, Brandenburg, Caitlin, Rohde, Alexia, Berg, Karianne and Wallace, Sarah J. (2016). Aphasia in later life. In A. N. Pachana (Ed.), Encyclopedia of Geropsychology (pp. 1-7) Singapore: Springer Singapore. doi:10.1007/978-981-287-080-3_346-1

  • Worrall, L., Davidson, B., Howe, T. and Rose, T. (2007). Clients as teachers: Two aphasia groups at the University of Queensland. In R. J. Elman (Ed.), Group Treatment of Neurogenic Communication Disorders (pp. 127-145) San Diego: Plural Publishing.

  • Worrall, Linda, Howe, Tami and Rose, Tanya (2006). Educating Clients with speech and language impairments. In K. McKenna and L. Tooth (Ed.), Client Education: A Partnership Approach for Health Practitioners (pp. 206-225) Sydney: University of New South Wales Press.

Journal Article

Conference Publication

Other Outputs

PhD and MPhil Supervision

Current Supervision

  • Doctor Philosophy — Principal Advisor

    Other advisors:

  • Doctor Philosophy — Principal Advisor

    Other advisors:

  • Doctor Philosophy — Associate Advisor

    Other advisors:

  • Doctor Philosophy — Associate Advisor

  • Doctor Philosophy — Associate Advisor

    Other advisors:

  • Doctor Philosophy — Associate Advisor

    Other advisors:

Completed Supervision

  • (2016) Doctor Philosophy — Associate Advisor

    Other advisors:

Possible Research Projects

Note for students: The possible research projects listed on this page may not be comprehensive or up to date. Always feel free to contact the staff for more information, and also with your own research ideas.

  • Parent-child interaction therapy is widely used by speech-language pathologists (SLPs) in the treatment of developmental language difficulties. This family-centred intervention involves coaching parents to use language facilitation strategies, such as commenting on their child’s interests. There is currently no standardised tool available for SLPs to rate parents’ use of language facilitation strategies. This project will develop a standardised tool for capturing parents’ use of language facilitation strategies in a clinical context. SLPs require a validated tool to guide intervention and evaluate outcomes of their family-centred SLP service.

  • Family members play a vital role in accessing health information for people with aphasia and have rated information about aphasia as their most important informational need post-stroke. The need for information to be provided to family members proactively and flexibly, particularly in the early period post-stroke has been recognised. This project will focus on developing and evaluating a resource for family members new to living with aphasia, co-developed with family members who have previously journeyed though the early phases of the care-continuum.