Dr Peter Jacobson

Lecturer in CMP

School of Mathematics and Physics
Faculty of Science
p.jacobson@uq.edu.au
+61 7 334 68753

Overview

Dr Peter Jacobson's research interests are: Scanning Probe Microscopy (STM/AFM), Single Atom Magnetism, Kondo Physics, 2D Materials, Oxide Surfaces, and Molecular Machines.

He recieved his PhD from Tulane University (New Orleans) in 2012. Before coming to UQ (June 2019), he worked at the Max Planck Institute for Solid State Research (Stuttgart, Germany), TU Wien (Vienna, Austria), and Uni Graz (Graz, Austria).

For more details on research see: https://scholar.google.com/citations?user=4ZcJt34AAAAJ&hl=en

At UQ he is setting up a laboratory from scratch - busy, busy...

Qualifications

  • Doctor of Philosophy, Tulane University

Publications

View all Publications

Available Projects

  • Project Level: Honours, Masters, Winter/Summer

    Optical methods are well suited to study bulk properties of materials and devices but are typically insensitive to surface phenomena. Recently, reflectance difference spectroscopy (RDS) has emerged as a powerful tool to study adsorption, growth, and the electronic states of very thin molecular layers. In this project, the student will build an RDS system for a precision deposition instrument housed at the UQ Centre for Microscopy and Microanalysis.

    The student will gain experience with optical set ups and measurements, ultrahigh vacuum equipment, thin film deposition, and electron diffraction. RDS is a technique with broad importance in industrial settings ranging from in-line monitoring of growth processes to electrochemical processes.

  • Project Level: Honours, Masters, Winter/Summer

    Since the isolation of graphene in 2004, two-dimensional layered materials have been at the forefront of fundamental and applied condensed matter physics. However, unlike graphene, many 2D materials react strongly with air, hampering their incorporation in new devices. This is particularly true of layered halide magnets (MX3, M = transition metal, X = Cl, Br, I) such as CrI3. In this project, the student will study methods of preventing material degradation in air using a new ultrahigh vacuum system housed at the UQ Centre for Microscopy and Microanalysis.

    The student will gain experience with device fabrication, ultrahigh vacuum equipment, thin film deposition, and electron diffraction.

  • Project Level: Honours, Masters, Winter/Summer

    High quality factor microwave resonators are critical components of quantum computer architectures. Aluminum resonators on silicon are now standard components in these architectures, but the measured quality factors in these resonators is lower than expected. Recent work suggest that the limiting factor for these devices are imperfections at the metal-substrate interace. This project focuses on preparing atomically precise interfaces between Aluminum and Silicon for improved superconducting qubits. Using new equipment housed at CMM, the student will prepare clean Silicon surfaces under ultrahigh vacuum conditions and develop procedures to grow high quality factor resonators.

    The student will gain experience with ultrahigh vacuum equipment, electron spectroscopy, electron diffraction, and low temperature instrumentation.

View all Available Projects

Publications

Featured Publications

Journal Article

Conference Publication

Possible Research Projects

Note for students: The possible research projects listed on this page may not be comprehensive or up to date. Always feel free to contact the staff for more information, and also with your own research ideas.

  • Project Level: Honours, Masters, Winter/Summer

    Optical methods are well suited to study bulk properties of materials and devices but are typically insensitive to surface phenomena. Recently, reflectance difference spectroscopy (RDS) has emerged as a powerful tool to study adsorption, growth, and the electronic states of very thin molecular layers. In this project, the student will build an RDS system for a precision deposition instrument housed at the UQ Centre for Microscopy and Microanalysis.

    The student will gain experience with optical set ups and measurements, ultrahigh vacuum equipment, thin film deposition, and electron diffraction. RDS is a technique with broad importance in industrial settings ranging from in-line monitoring of growth processes to electrochemical processes.

  • Project Level: Honours, Masters, Winter/Summer

    Since the isolation of graphene in 2004, two-dimensional layered materials have been at the forefront of fundamental and applied condensed matter physics. However, unlike graphene, many 2D materials react strongly with air, hampering their incorporation in new devices. This is particularly true of layered halide magnets (MX3, M = transition metal, X = Cl, Br, I) such as CrI3. In this project, the student will study methods of preventing material degradation in air using a new ultrahigh vacuum system housed at the UQ Centre for Microscopy and Microanalysis.

    The student will gain experience with device fabrication, ultrahigh vacuum equipment, thin film deposition, and electron diffraction.

  • Project Level: Honours, Masters, Winter/Summer

    High quality factor microwave resonators are critical components of quantum computer architectures. Aluminum resonators on silicon are now standard components in these architectures, but the measured quality factors in these resonators is lower than expected. Recent work suggest that the limiting factor for these devices are imperfections at the metal-substrate interace. This project focuses on preparing atomically precise interfaces between Aluminum and Silicon for improved superconducting qubits. Using new equipment housed at CMM, the student will prepare clean Silicon surfaces under ultrahigh vacuum conditions and develop procedures to grow high quality factor resonators.

    The student will gain experience with ultrahigh vacuum equipment, electron spectroscopy, electron diffraction, and low temperature instrumentation.