Dr Rebecca Cramp

Research Fellow

School of Biological Sciences
Faculty of Science
r.cramp@uq.edu.au
+61 7 336 58539

Overview

I am a comparative and environmental physiologist based at the University of Queensland. My research focuses primarily how the environment constrains the physiology of invertebrates, fish, amphibians and reptiles. I have a highly diverse research program that incorporates fundamental, curiosity-driven research and increasingly, a more applied research agenda in the emerging field of conservation physiology. Conservation physiology explores the responses of organisms to anthropogenic threats and attempts to determine the ecophysiological constraints dictated by current conditions and future environmental change. My research interests encompass the general areas of osmo- and ion-regulation, digestive and thermal physiology, environmental drivers of physiological function (specifically immune function and disease susceptibility) and animal performance in anthropogenically modified environments.

Research Interests

  • Conservation Physiology
    Conservation physiology explores the responses of organisms to anthropogenic threats and attempts to determine the ecophysiological constraints dictated by current conditions and future environmental change. By taking a conservation physiology approach to studies of the impacts of environmental change on organisms, we can determine not only the degree of threat but most importantly an organisms’ capacity for acclimatisation/adaptation to these changes.
  • Integrative Physiology

Research Impacts

My research program, incorporates fundamental, curiosity-driven research and increasingly, a more applied research agenda in the emerging field of conservation physiology. By taking a conservation physiology approach to studies of the impacts of environmental change on organisms, we can determine not only the degree of threat but most importantly an organisms’ capacity for acclimatisation/adaptation to these changes. Exploring how organisms cope at environmental extremes and predicting how they respond to environmental change is becoming increasingly important as ecosystems are modified and threatened by human activity and climate change.

Qualifications

  • Doctor of Philosophy, The University of Queensland
  • Bachelor of Science (Honours), The University of Queensland
  • Bachelor of Science, The University of Queensland

Publications

View all Publications

Supervision

  • Doctor Philosophy

  • Doctor Philosophy

  • Doctor Philosophy

View all Supervision

Publications

Book Chapter

  • Ohmer, Michel E.B., Alton, Lesley A. and Cramp, Rebecca L. (2020). Physiology provides a window into how the multi-stressor environment contributes to amphibian declines. Conservation physiology: applications for wildlife conservation and management. (pp. 165-182) edited by Christine L. Madliger, Craig E. Franklin, Oliver P. Love and Steven J. Cooke. Oxford, United Kingdom: Oxford University Press. doi: 10.1093/oso/9780198843610.003.0010

  • Cramp, Rebecca L., Rodgers, Essie M., Myrick, Christopher, Sakker, James and Franklin, Craig E. (2020). Using physiological tools to unlock barriers to fish passage in freshwater ecosystems. Conservation physiology: applications for wildlife conservation and management. (pp. 89-108) edited by Christine L. Madliger, Craig E. Franklin, Oliver P. Love and Steven J. Cooke. Oxford, United Kingdom: Oxford University Press. doi: 10.1093/oso/9780198843610.003.0006

Journal Article

Conference Publication

Other Outputs

PhD and MPhil Supervision

Current Supervision

  • Doctor Philosophy — Associate Advisor

    Other advisors:

  • Doctor Philosophy — Associate Advisor

    Other advisors:

  • Doctor Philosophy — Associate Advisor

  • Doctor Philosophy — Associate Advisor

    Other advisors:

  • Doctor Philosophy — Associate Advisor

  • Doctor Philosophy — Associate Advisor

  • Doctor Philosophy — Associate Advisor

    Other advisors:

  • Doctor Philosophy — Associate Advisor

    Other advisors:

Completed Supervision