Dr Robyn Cave

Lecturer in Horticulture

School of Agriculture and Food Sciences
Faculty of Science
r.cave@uq.edu.au
+61 7 54601 240

Overview

Dr Robyn Cave is a horticulturalist with research experience in plant reproductive biology and the control of plant development and flowering. Robyn completed her undergraduate degree, including Honours, at The University of Queensland (UQ) in 2007. Her Honours thesis identified the environmental signals responsible for triggering flowering in two Australian native herbs for which she was awarded the Bryan Memorial Medal for a superior Honours research project in the field of agriculture. For her outstanding academic results during her program, a prestigious University Medal was awarded. Robyn completed her doctorate in 2011 at UQ, where she developed a model to predict the duration of vegetative and reproductive phases in response to temperature, vernalisation and daylength for Brunonia Australis and Calandrinia sp. This new model included a multifaceted natural vernalisation component that could be used to schedule production of other cold-requiring herbs and to screen natural plant populations vulnerable to global warming. The results of the project were published in National and International plant science Journals. Robyn commenced her current role in December 2014 and is working on a range of projects, including yield potential of grafted vegetables and improving root stock development of pecan.

Qualifications

  • Doctor of Philosophy, The University of Queensland
  • Bachelor of Applied Science (Honours), The University of Queensland
  • Bachelor of Applied Science, The University of Queensland

Publications

View all Publications

Supervision

  • Doctor Philosophy

  • Master Philosophy

  • Master Philosophy

View all Supervision

Available Projects

  • There are a number of potential projects in the area of apple tree physiology and dormancy that are linked to climate change and/or disease resistant varieties. Many of these projects will require the collection of field data. However, others are primarily 'desk top' studies.

View all Available Projects

Publications

Journal Article

Conference Publication

  • Proud, Christopher, Hammadil, Muneer, Cave, Robyn, Mitchell, Jacquie and Fukai, Shu (2015). Cold temperature under aerobic conditions increases spikelet sterility in rice (Oryza sativa L.). In: Tina Botwright Acuña, Matthew Harrison, Carina Moeller and David Parsons, Building Productive, Diverse and Sustainable Landscapes: Proceedings of the 17th Australian Agronomy Conference. Australian Society of Agronomy, Hobart, TAS, Australia, (). 20-24 September 2015.

  • Currey, C. J., Lopez, R. G., Cave, R. L., Harrison, D. K. and Johnston, M. E. (2015). Temperature affects germination of native Australian Gomphrena and Ptilotus species differently. In: R. A. Criley, XXIX International Horticultural Congress on Horticulture: Sustaining Lives, Livelihoods and Landscapes (IHC2014): International Symposium on Ornamental Horticulture in the Global Greenhouse. International Horticulture Congress, Brisbane, QLD, Australia, (491-498). 17-22 August 2014. doi:10.17660/ActaHortic.2015.1104.71

  • Cave, R. L., Erwin, J. E., Hammer, G. L., Birch, C. J. and Johnston, M. E. (2012). An experimental approach for developing seed lines of new Australian native flowering pot plants. In: Proceedings of the XXVIII International Horticultural Congress On Science and Horticulture for People (IHC2010): Proceedings of the International Symposium On Advances in Ornamentals, Landscape and Urban Horticulture. XXVIII International Horticultural Congress (IHC2010), Lisbon, Portugal, (37-43). 22-27 August 2010.

Other Outputs

Grants (Administered at UQ)

PhD and MPhil Supervision

Current Supervision

Possible Research Projects

Note for students: The possible research projects listed on this page may not be comprehensive or up to date. Always feel free to contact the staff for more information, and also with your own research ideas.

  • There are a number of potential projects in the area of apple tree physiology and dormancy that are linked to climate change and/or disease resistant varieties. Many of these projects will require the collection of field data. However, others are primarily 'desk top' studies.