Dr Amalie Dyda

Senior Lecturer in Epidemiology

School of Public Health
Faculty of Medicine

Overview

Dr Amalie Dyda is an infectious disease epidemiologist working as a teaching and research academic in the School of Public Health. In 2009 she completed a Master of Applied Epidemiology at the Australian National University, followed by a PhD investigating vaccine preventable diseases in adults at the University of New South Wales in 2017. She has experience working as a field epidemiologist in numerous health departments throughout Australia and has research experience in infectious diseases, data linkage and public health informatics. She is currently working on projects investigating the use of technology and machine learning methods to assist the public health response to infectious diseases, and links between social media use and health. Additionally, Amalie does a lot of work to improve gender equity in health and medical research, including working as part of the peer advisory committee for Franklin Women.

Research Interests

  • Public Health Informatics
    Amalie Dyda's research interests focus on the use of digital technology to improve public health practice, with a particular focus on infectious diseases and vaccination. Within this she is working on digital dashboards to assist in the monitoring of infectious diseases, and the links between social media use and vaccination uptake.

Qualifications

  • Doctor of Philosophy, University of New South Wales

Publications

View all Publications

Available Projects

  • Infectious diseases contribute to significant morbidity and mortality across the globe, highlighted by the COVID-19 pandemic. Increasing uptake of adult vaccination for diseases such as influenza and COVID-19 offers a cost-effective way to improve the health of adult populations and reduce healthcare costs, yet levels of uptake are sub-optimal. Adult vaccination uptake is affected by factors which often differ from those in childhood vaccination and are more often related to awareness and perceived risk, both of which can be affected by the information people consume. Overall, it is very challenging to measure the effects of misinformation exposure on health at an individual and population level, which is why we are proposing a mixed method study design to investigate this. This project aims to utilise machine learning and citizens science to measure the impact of vaccine misinformation on individuals and involve the online community in this research to determine the way in which they access, understand, use, and share information about vaccines online.

  • The COVID-19 pandemic has highlighted the economic, social, and health costs of infectious diseases. Surveillance is a key public health measure to enable early detection and inform public health action. In Australia, surveillance data for infectious diseases are collected primarily via the National Notifiable Disease Surveillance System (NNDSS). Currently, these data are provided via the NNDSS website, which has limited functionality. In response to the COVID-19 pandemic many interactive dashboards have been developed, similar dashboards could be developed for other diseases. This project aims to improve infectious disease surveillance by using novel data analytics and tools to provide timely and accessible data on epidemiological patterns. This may include developing an interactive dashboard for notifiable diseases in Australia, or linking novel datasets such as social media data with notifiable diseases data to assess the feasibility of use for surveillance.

View all Available Projects

Publications

Journal Article

Possible Research Projects

Note for students: The possible research projects listed on this page may not be comprehensive or up to date. Always feel free to contact the staff for more information, and also with your own research ideas.

  • Infectious diseases contribute to significant morbidity and mortality across the globe, highlighted by the COVID-19 pandemic. Increasing uptake of adult vaccination for diseases such as influenza and COVID-19 offers a cost-effective way to improve the health of adult populations and reduce healthcare costs, yet levels of uptake are sub-optimal. Adult vaccination uptake is affected by factors which often differ from those in childhood vaccination and are more often related to awareness and perceived risk, both of which can be affected by the information people consume. Overall, it is very challenging to measure the effects of misinformation exposure on health at an individual and population level, which is why we are proposing a mixed method study design to investigate this. This project aims to utilise machine learning and citizens science to measure the impact of vaccine misinformation on individuals and involve the online community in this research to determine the way in which they access, understand, use, and share information about vaccines online.

  • The COVID-19 pandemic has highlighted the economic, social, and health costs of infectious diseases. Surveillance is a key public health measure to enable early detection and inform public health action. In Australia, surveillance data for infectious diseases are collected primarily via the National Notifiable Disease Surveillance System (NNDSS). Currently, these data are provided via the NNDSS website, which has limited functionality. In response to the COVID-19 pandemic many interactive dashboards have been developed, similar dashboards could be developed for other diseases. This project aims to improve infectious disease surveillance by using novel data analytics and tools to provide timely and accessible data on epidemiological patterns. This may include developing an interactive dashboard for notifiable diseases in Australia, or linking novel datasets such as social media data with notifiable diseases data to assess the feasibility of use for surveillance.