Dr Nick Hudson

Senior Lecturer in Biochem & Met

School of Agriculture and Food Sciences
Faculty of Science
n.hudson@uq.edu.au
+61 7 54601 521

Overview

Nick Hudson was awarded his PhD through the Zoology department of the University of Queensland, after travelling from the UK on a Britain-Australia Society funded Northcote Scholarship. Before taking his current position in the School of Agriculture and Food Sciences he worked for the CSIRO in a multi-discplinary Systems Biology group. Through this group he helped develop methods using various RNA and DNA based biotechnologies to predict phenotypes of commercial importance in cattle, sheep, pigs and chickens. He continues to be interested in fostering efficient, environmentally friendly production enterprises using modern 'omics technologies. Nick is also interested in the development, physiology, metabolism and conservation of native Australian species.

Research Interests

  • Mitochondrial physiology
  • Functional genomics
  • Metabolism
  • Flux analysis
  • Agricultural resource utilisation
  • Wildlife biology of butterflies and frogs

Research Impacts

Nick is an active science communicator whose research has been disseminated through print, radio and television media. He hopes to make an impact on agricultural resource utilisation through a better understanding of production animal feed efficiency. He has a very active national and international network of collaborators from academe, government agencies and industry. This has provided a stimulating insight into industrial problems and how novel technologies and innovative concepts may inspire solutions.

Qualifications

  • Doctor of Philosophy, The University of Queensland

Publications

View all Publications

Available Projects

  • Global population growth is placing increasing demands on the agriculture sector to produce greater amounts of food more efficiently. Livestock products provide a source of protein for the world population and more efficient production will be required in the future to meet increasing demand. The proposed research program will investigate the mechanistic basis of variation in metabolic efficiency in beef cattle. Some cattle utilise feed more efficiently for production than others, while some are able to maintain muscle mass, liveweight and productivity under periods of nutritional and environmental stress. Why is this? The successful applicant will focus their research on the biology of the mitochondria and its role in determining metabolic efficiency in cattle.

View all Available Projects

Publications

Journal Article

Conference Publication

  • Kayes, Sara M., Cramp, Rebecca L., Hudson, Nicholas J. and Franklin, Craig E. (2009). Burrowing frog metabolism: maximising energy savings during dormancy. In: Abstracts of the Annual Main Meeting of the Society of Experimental Biology. Annual Meeting of the Society for Experimental Biology, Glasgow Scotland, (S101-S101). 28June-01 July 2009. doi:10.1016/j.cbpa.2009.04.126

  • Kayes, S., Hudson, N. and Franklin, C. (2008). Opioids as triggers for metabolic depression in the frog, Cyclorana alboguttata. In: Comparative Biochemistry and Physiology A-Molecular & Integrative Physiology. Annual Meeting of the Society-for-Experimental-Biology, Marseille, France, (S100-S100). 6-10 July, 2008. doi:10.1016/j.cbpa.2008.04.202

  • Reverter, Antonio, Hudson, Nicholas J., Wang, Yonghong, Tan, Siok-Hwee, Barris, Wes, Byrne, Keren A., McWilliam, Sean M., Bottema, Cynthia D. K., Kister, Adam, Greenwood, Paul L., Harper, Gregory S., Lehnert, Sigrid A. and Dalrymple, Brian P. (2006). A gene coexpression network for bovine skeletal muscle inferred from microarray data. In: 2nd International Symposium on Animal Functional Geonomics (2nd ISAFG), E Lansing, MI, United States, (76-83). 16-19 May 2006. doi:10.1152/physiolgenomics.00105.2006

  • Choy, P. T., Lan, M., Hudson, N. J., Franklin, C. and Lavidis, N. A. (2004). Modulation of transmitter release from neuromuscular terminals of green striped burrowing frog, Cyclorana alboguttata. In: Proceedings of the Society for Neuroscience 34th Annual Meeting. Society for Neuroscience 34th Annual Meeting, San Diego, United States, (). 23–27 October 2004.

Other Outputs

Grants (Administered at UQ)

Possible Research Projects

Note for students: The possible research projects listed on this page may not be comprehensive or up to date. Always feel free to contact the staff for more information, and also with your own research ideas.

  • Global population growth is placing increasing demands on the agriculture sector to produce greater amounts of food more efficiently. Livestock products provide a source of protein for the world population and more efficient production will be required in the future to meet increasing demand. The proposed research program will investigate the mechanistic basis of variation in metabolic efficiency in beef cattle. Some cattle utilise feed more efficiently for production than others, while some are able to maintain muscle mass, liveweight and productivity under periods of nutritional and environmental stress. Why is this? The successful applicant will focus their research on the biology of the mitochondria and its role in determining metabolic efficiency in cattle.