Professor Tom Stace

ARC Future Fellowship

Physics
Faculty of Science
stace@physics.uq.edu.au
+61 7 336 51868

Overview

Prof Stace completed his PhD at the Cavendish Lab, University of Cambridge in the UK on quantum computing, followed by postdoctoral research at the Department of Applied Mathematics and Theoretical Physics, also at Cambridge, and Queens' College, Cambridge. He has been a researcher at the University of Queensland since 2006, firstly on an ARC Postdoctoral Research Fellowship, then on an ARC Research Fellowship, and is currently an ARC Future Fellow.

His research has largely focused on applying methods from quantum optics to solid state devices for use in quantum information applications, and more recently on error correction protocols. He also works on high precision measurement in collaboration with experimental colleagues at UWA, in a project whose ultimate aim is to contribute to the international definition of Boltzmann's constant, and some biophysics.

Prof Stace also consults for UniQuest, UQ's commercial arm, on scientific and technical matters.

Research Interests

  • Quantum Error Correction
    One of the challenges of quantum information is to develop new and better quantum error correcting codes.

Qualifications

  • B Engineering (Hons), The University of Western Australia
  • B Science (Hons), The University of Western Australia
  • PhD, University of Cambridge

Publications

  • Jouir, Tasarinan, Strydom, Reuben, Stace, Thomas M. and Srinivasan, Mandyam (2018) Vision-only egomotion estimation in 6DOF using a sky compass. Robotica, 36 10: 1571-1589. doi:10.1017/S0263574718000577

  • Rosario Hamann, Andrés, Müller, Clemens, Jerger, Markus, Zanner, Maximilian, Combes, Joshua, Pletyukhov, Mikhail, Weides, Martin, Stace, Thomas M. and Fedorov, Arkady (2018) Nonreciprocity realized with quantum nonlinearity. Physical Review Letters, 121 12: . doi:10.1103/PhysRevLett.121.123601

  • Müller, Clemens, Guan, Shengwei, Vogt, Nicolas, Cole, Jared H. and Stace, Thomas M. (2018) Passive on-chip superconducting circulator using a ring of tunnel junctions. Physical Review Letters, 120 21: 213602. doi:10.1103/PhysRevLett.120.213602

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Supervision

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Available Projects

  • My goal in this research is to develop new ways of harnessing the unusual properties of quantum systems to build new technologies. This includes high precision sensing, quantum simulation and photosynthesis. If you are an exceptional student looking to study for your PhD at the cutting edge of physics and technology, then please contact me.

  • When building a quantum computer, or other quantum processing device, it is important to be able recover from errors that may arise. This is accomplished using error correcting codes, which redundantly encode quantum information in a way that enables its recovery in the event that errors occur. One of the problems with many error correcting schemes is that they have a very large overhead: very many physical, error-prone qubits are required to perform the task of a few logical, error-free qubits. Please make contact if you are interested in pursuing research in this area.

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Publications

Journal Article

Conference Publication

Other Outputs

Grants (Administered at UQ)

PhD and MPhil Supervision

Current Supervision

  • Doctor Philosophy — Principal Advisor

  • Doctor Philosophy — Principal Advisor

  • Doctor Philosophy — Principal Advisor

  • Doctor Philosophy — Associate Advisor

    Other advisors:

  • Doctor Philosophy — Associate Advisor

    Other advisors:

Completed Supervision

Possible Research Projects

Note for students: The possible research projects listed on this page may not be comprehensive or up to date. Always feel free to contact the staff for more information, and also with your own research ideas.

  • My goal in this research is to develop new ways of harnessing the unusual properties of quantum systems to build new technologies. This includes high precision sensing, quantum simulation and photosynthesis. If you are an exceptional student looking to study for your PhD at the cutting edge of physics and technology, then please contact me.

  • When building a quantum computer, or other quantum processing device, it is important to be able recover from errors that may arise. This is accomplished using error correcting codes, which redundantly encode quantum information in a way that enables its recovery in the event that errors occur. One of the problems with many error correcting schemes is that they have a very large overhead: very many physical, error-prone qubits are required to perform the task of a few logical, error-free qubits. Please make contact if you are interested in pursuing research in this area.