Associate Professor Carissa Klein

ARC Future Fellow

School of Earth and Environmental Sciences
Faculty of Science
c.klein@uq.edu.au
+61 7 336 56074

Overview

Carissa Klein is a Senior Research Fellow at The University of Queensland, working in the field of conservation science. She leads a group of students and post-doctoral researchers in partnership with numerous non-government organisations (e.g. Wildlife Conservation Society) and government departments (e.g., Sabah Parks in Borneo) around the world. Her team's research is motivated by real-world conservation management and policy problems. They specialise in integrating social, economic, and ecological information to develop solutions that improve outcomes for nature and people. We love all things ocean so tend to focus our effort on conserving marine and coastal ecosystems!

Carissa has degrees in Chemistry (BA, 2000), Environmental Science (BA, 2000), Environmental Science and Management (MS, 2006) and Conservation Science (PhD, 2010). Her postgraduate studies were at The University of California, Santa Barbara and The University of Queensland. She has received numerous competitive awards, including two that acknowledge her achievements in setting up successful and lasting international collaborations: The Asia Pacific Economic Corporation Science Prize for Innovation, Research and Education (ASPIRE) and the American Australia Association Sir Keith Murdoch Fellowship.

Qualifications

  • Master of Science, U.C Santa Barbara
  • Doctor of Philosophy, The University of Queensland

Publications

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Grants

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Supervision

  • Doctor Philosophy

  • Doctor Philosophy

  • Doctor Philosophy

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Available Projects

  • This project aims to improve the social and environmental sustainability of wild caught seafood globally. This project expects to generate new knowledge in the area of seafood trade and sustainability using interdisciplinary approaches that account for social sustainability concepts and the displacement of fishing impacts. Expected outcomes include innovative approaches that can improve the traceability and sustainability of seafood and new international collaborations. This should provide significant benefits to the ocean, by proposing innovative ways for protecting the ocean through improving the sustainability of trade policies, and to the billions of people that depend on a healthy ocean for their health and livelihood.

    The student would investigate the social, economic, and environmental implications of disparate trade and international fishing scenarios, using Australia as an example. The ideal student will have quantitative modelling skills (or the ability and interest to learn these skills) and interests in environmental policy, environmental economics, biodiversity conservation, or ecosystem services. The project is funded by an ARC Future Fellowship with opportunities to attend international science and policy meetings.

View all Available Projects

Publications

Book Chapter

  • Watts, Matthew E., Stewart, Romola R., Martin, Tara G., Klein, Carissa J., Carwardine, Josie and Possingham, Hugh P. (2017). Systematic conservation planning with Marxan. Learning landscape ecology: a practical guide to concepts and techniques. (pp. 211-227) edited by Sarah E. Gergel and Monica G. Turner. New York, NY, United States: Springer New York. doi: 10.1007/978-1-4939-6374-4_13

  • Wilson, Kerrie A., Cabeza, Mar and Klein, Carissa J. (2009). Fundamental concepts of spatial conservation prioritization. Spatial conservation prioritization: Quantitative methods and computational tools. (pp. 16-27) edited by Atte Moilanen, Kerrie A. Wilson and Hugh Possingham. Oxford, U.K.: Oxford University Press.

  • Game, Eddie, Carwardine, Josie, Wilson, Kerrie, Watts, Matt, Klein, Carissa and Possingham, Hugh (2007). How to integrate cost, threat and multiple actions into conservation planning for reserves and stewardship. Protected areas: buffering nature against climate change. (pp. 97-99) edited by Martin Taylor and Penelope Figgis. Sydney, NSW, Australia: WWF-Australia.

Journal Article

Conference Publication

Other Outputs

Grants (Administered at UQ)

PhD and MPhil Supervision

Current Supervision

Completed Supervision

Possible Research Projects

Note for students: The possible research projects listed on this page may not be comprehensive or up to date. Always feel free to contact the staff for more information, and also with your own research ideas.

  • This project aims to improve the social and environmental sustainability of wild caught seafood globally. This project expects to generate new knowledge in the area of seafood trade and sustainability using interdisciplinary approaches that account for social sustainability concepts and the displacement of fishing impacts. Expected outcomes include innovative approaches that can improve the traceability and sustainability of seafood and new international collaborations. This should provide significant benefits to the ocean, by proposing innovative ways for protecting the ocean through improving the sustainability of trade policies, and to the billions of people that depend on a healthy ocean for their health and livelihood.

    The student would investigate the social, economic, and environmental implications of disparate trade and international fishing scenarios, using Australia as an example. The ideal student will have quantitative modelling skills (or the ability and interest to learn these skills) and interests in environmental policy, environmental economics, biodiversity conservation, or ecosystem services. The project is funded by an ARC Future Fellowship with opportunities to attend international science and policy meetings.