Dr Sara Alidoust

Lecturer

School of Earth and Environmental Sciences
Faculty of Science
s.alidoust@uq.edu.au
+61 7 336 56671

Overview

Sara (PhD, MArch, BArch) is a lecturer in planning at the School of Earth and Environmental Sciences. Prior to joining the University of Queensland, she worked as a researcher, educator and practitioner (in private sector and local government) in both Australia and internationally.

Her research is interdisciplinary and focuses on the interrelationships between policy, planning, design and public health. She investigates the role of urban policy and built environment in the health and wellbeing of the community, including the ageing population. Her work is participatory and focuses on planning inclusive cities that embraces diversity through community engagement in planning and decision making.

Research Interests

  • Planning Healthy Cities
  • Planning for Social Sustainability and Community Wellbeing
  • Age-Friendly Planning
  • Stakeholder Consultation and Participatory Planning
  • Emerging Housing Models in the Context of Circular Economy
  • Redefining Neighbourhood Social Life in the Internet Era
  • The role of (Online) Network Communities in Community Wellbeing

Qualifications

  • Doctor of Philosophy, Griffith University

Publications

View all Publications

Available Projects

  • The projects focus on the associations between urban planning and the three components of health: physical, mental and social health. Some topics include: 1. The role of built environment and planning policies in physical activity, active transport, healthy behaviours. 2. Urban planning impacts on social capital and community cohesion. 3. Planning policies and built environmental design for mental health.

  • The projects focus on urban planning and policies aimed at developing enabling environments for older people to live an active life and stay engaged in the community. Some topics include: 1. Planning policies for developing age-friendly cities. 2. Developing age-friendly cities in China. 3. Emerging housing models and lifestyles for older people, e.g. house-sitting, co-living. 4. Neighbourhood planning for healthy ageing. 5. Master planned communities and community development for an ageing population.

  • Some topics include: 1. Developing evaluation frameworks for social sustainability. 2. Developing evaluation frameworks for community wellbeing. 3. Community engagement in planning policy.

View all Available Projects

Publications

Book Chapter

Journal Article

Conference Publication

Other Outputs

Possible Research Projects

Note for students: The possible research projects listed on this page may not be comprehensive or up to date. Always feel free to contact the staff for more information, and also with your own research ideas.

  • The projects focus on the associations between urban planning and the three components of health: physical, mental and social health. Some topics include: 1. The role of built environment and planning policies in physical activity, active transport, healthy behaviours. 2. Urban planning impacts on social capital and community cohesion. 3. Planning policies and built environmental design for mental health.

  • The projects focus on urban planning and policies aimed at developing enabling environments for older people to live an active life and stay engaged in the community. Some topics include: 1. Planning policies for developing age-friendly cities. 2. Developing age-friendly cities in China. 3. Emerging housing models and lifestyles for older people, e.g. house-sitting, co-living. 4. Neighbourhood planning for healthy ageing. 5. Master planned communities and community development for an ageing population.

  • Some topics include: 1. Developing evaluation frameworks for social sustainability. 2. Developing evaluation frameworks for community wellbeing. 3. Community engagement in planning policy.

  • Potential topics include: 1. Emerging housing models in the context of circular economy. 2. Redefining neighbourhood social life in the Internet era. 3. The role of (online) network communities in community wellbeing.

  • The projects focus on the health impacts of climate change on vulnerable community groups, including older people.