Dr Scott Lieske

Lecturer in Geography

School of Earth and Environmental Sciences
Faculty of Science

Overview

Dr. Lieske’s overarching research theme is spatial decision support. Topics include city analytics, the costs of sprawl, planning support system theory and implementation as well as regional environmental change. Additional areas of expertise include the effective use of geographic visualisation as a communication and decision support tool.

Research Interests

  • Understanding the structure and dynamics of complex human and natural systems
    This research uses geographical analysis and visual tools to develop and communicate spatially explicit models that synthesize existing biological, socio-economic, and other geographic data. Goals are to assess vulnerability and risk, as well as characterize resilience, mitigation and adaptation priorities.
  • Geographic Information Systems and Indigenous Ways of Knowing
  • Using crowd sourced data to understand human movement through the built environment
  • Urban Form, Infrastructure and Public Services – the Costs of Sprawl and Challenges of Density
  • Geographical Visualization for Linking Scientific and Local Knowledge

Qualifications

  • Doctor of Philosophy, University of the Sunshine Coast

Publications

  • Leao, Simone Z., Lieske, Scott N. , Conrow, Lindsey, Doig, Jonathan, Mann, Vandana and Pettit, Chris J. (2017) Building a national-longitudinal geospatial bicycling data collection from crowdsourcing. Urban Science, 1 3: . doi:10.3390/urbansci1030023

  • Pettit, Christopher, Lieske, Scott N. and Jamal, Murad (2017). CityDash: visualising a changing city using open data. In Stan Geertman, Andrew Allan, Chris Pettit and John Stillwell (Ed.), Planning support science for smarter urban futures (pp. 337-353) Cham, Switzerland: Springer. doi:10.1007/978-3-319-57819-4_19

  • Izadpanahi, Parisa, Leao, Simone Z., Lieske, Scott N. and Pettit, Christopher (2017). Factors motivating bicycling in Sydney: analysing crowd-sourced data. In: Luisa Brotas, Susan Roaf and Fergus Nicol, Proceedings of 33rd PLEA International Conference. Passive Low Energy Architecture (PLEA), Edinburgh, Scotland, (1355-1362). 3-5 July 2017.

View all Publications

Available Projects

  • Project Summary

    This research project will provide an assessment on the impacts of the seasonal and tidal effects on Darwin Harbour’s water quality. The project will utilise satellite imagery from ocean colour sensors collected over the Darwin Region. Rainfall and climate data from the Bureau of Meteorology may also be used in the analysis. The ideal candidate to this position will have an interest in marine biology, remote sensing or climate processes and have a knowledge of, or an interest in using, software such as ArcGIS and Matlab.

    Project Background

    Season vs Tides: what drives water quality, and clarity, in Darwin Harbour? Darwin Harbour is an isolated, macro-tidal coastal region that has amongst the largest tides in the world (7.8 m). It has also a monsoonal climate characterized by a wet season that extends from November to April. During the monsoon, more than three-quarters of the yearly rainfall (~1,700 mm/yr) occurs, thus generating river runoffs that discharge into the Harbour. Rainfall is the main driver of erosion process, therefore any spatial and temporal variability of rainfall affects the sediment delivery and water turbidity.

    Water turbidity has a direct impact on water quality and phytoplankton growth in particular, because it limits light penetration in the water column, affecting algal photosynthesis. It is currently unknown whether the seasonal effect has a larger role on water quality than the tidal cycle in Darwin Harbour. There is a need to determine the main driver, so that we may be able to understand if water quality may be further affected by a changing climate as climate models possibly predict more frequent and intense rainfall in tropical regions.

    For more information contact Dr David Blondeau-Patisssier (CSIRO, David.Blondeau-Patissier@csiro.au), Dr Daniel Harris (SEES UQ daniel.harris@uq.edu.au) or Dr Scott N. Lieske (scott.lieske@uq.edu.au, SEES UQ)

  • Mapping sub-surface water quality parameters (organic matter, phytoplankton and detritus concentrations) in the Great Barrier Reef and Northern Australia tropical waters from a large dataset of in situ spectrophotometer measurements.

    Project Summary

    A large dataset of water column profiles (and continuous surface transects) of water quality parameters, collected from in situ spectrophotometers deployed routinely at sampling stations during field campaigns, has been collected by the CSIRO Aquatic Remote Sensing group over the years. Data were sampled in the waters of the Great Barrier Reef lagoon and northern territory at various locations and seasons. Data collected within the first ~3 m of these profiles has been used to derive relationships for the surface waters, in relation with ocean colour satellite algorithms. A parameter in particular, the total absorption coefficient, was mostly used. But other parameters are available from these profiles, such as the phytoplankton and organic matter absorption coefficients, and at various depths – what story do they tell us? What contributes more to water attenuation: organic matter, phytoplankton or detritus?

    Project Background

    This research project will first help assess how measurements from these in situ spectrophotometers compare to filter pads for parameters other than the total absorption coefficient. Often dismissed, this assessment will help make use of these measurements more routinely. Secondly, measurements at depths below -3m are dismissed because ocean colour remote sensing satellite data is often unable to provide information below the top surface layer. However this information may provide further insights into how the use of in situ profile measurements can complement satellite imagery of the lagoon’s surface waters with the dynamics of the phytoplankton and dissolved organic materials at various depths.

    For more information contact Dr David Blondeau-Patisssier (CSIRO, David.Blondeau-Patissier@csiro.au), Dr Daniel Harris (SEES UQ daniel.harris@uq.edu.au) or Dr Scott N. Lieske (scott.lieske@uq.edu.au, SEES UQ)

View all Available Projects

Publications

Book Chapter

  • Pettit, Christopher, Lieske, Scott N. and Jamal, Murad (2017). CityDash: visualising a changing city using open data. In Stan Geertman, Andrew Allan, Chris Pettit and John Stillwell (Ed.), Planning support science for smarter urban futures (pp. 337-353) Cham, Switzerland: Springer. doi:10.1007/978-3-319-57819-4_19

  • Lieske, Scott N., Martin, Kari, Grant, Ben and Baldwin, Claudia (2015). Visualization methods for linking scientific and local knowledge of climate change impacts. In Planning Support Systems and Smart Cities (pp. 373-389) Heidelberg, Germany: Springer. doi:10.1007/978-3-319-18368-8_20

  • Lieske, Scott N., Coupal, Roger H., Hamerlinck Jeffrey D., McLeod, Donald M. and Scofield, Anna M. (2013). Planning support systems for fiscally sustainable planning. In Stan Geertman, Fred Toppen and John Stillwell (Ed.), Planning Support Systems for Sustainable Urban Development (pp. 127-147) Heidelberg, Germany: Springer. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-37533-0_8

  • Lieske, Scott N. (2009). Enhancing Comprehensive Planning with Public Engagement and Planning Support Integration. In Planning Support Systems Best Practice and New Methods (pp. 295-315) Dordrecht, Netherlands: Springer. doi:10.1007/978-1-4020-8952-7_15

  • Lieske, Scott N. (2009). Maintaining downtown curb appeal in Sheridan, Wyoming. In Christopher Thomas and Nancy Humenik-Sappington (Ed.), GIS For Decision Support and Public Policy Making (pp. 165-170) Redlands, California: ESRI Press.

Journal Article

Conference Publication

  • Izadpanahi, Parisa, Leao, Simone Z., Lieske, Scott N. and Pettit, Christopher (2017). Factors motivating bicycling in Sydney: analysing crowd-sourced data. In: Luisa Brotas, Susan Roaf and Fergus Nicol, Proceedings of 33rd PLEA International Conference. Passive Low Energy Architecture (PLEA), Edinburgh, Scotland, (1355-1362). 3-5 July 2017.

Possible Research Projects

Note for students: The possible research projects listed on this page may not be comprehensive or up to date. Always feel free to contact the staff for more information, and also with your own research ideas.

  • Project Summary

    This research project will provide an assessment on the impacts of the seasonal and tidal effects on Darwin Harbour’s water quality. The project will utilise satellite imagery from ocean colour sensors collected over the Darwin Region. Rainfall and climate data from the Bureau of Meteorology may also be used in the analysis. The ideal candidate to this position will have an interest in marine biology, remote sensing or climate processes and have a knowledge of, or an interest in using, software such as ArcGIS and Matlab.

    Project Background

    Season vs Tides: what drives water quality, and clarity, in Darwin Harbour? Darwin Harbour is an isolated, macro-tidal coastal region that has amongst the largest tides in the world (7.8 m). It has also a monsoonal climate characterized by a wet season that extends from November to April. During the monsoon, more than three-quarters of the yearly rainfall (~1,700 mm/yr) occurs, thus generating river runoffs that discharge into the Harbour. Rainfall is the main driver of erosion process, therefore any spatial and temporal variability of rainfall affects the sediment delivery and water turbidity.

    Water turbidity has a direct impact on water quality and phytoplankton growth in particular, because it limits light penetration in the water column, affecting algal photosynthesis. It is currently unknown whether the seasonal effect has a larger role on water quality than the tidal cycle in Darwin Harbour. There is a need to determine the main driver, so that we may be able to understand if water quality may be further affected by a changing climate as climate models possibly predict more frequent and intense rainfall in tropical regions.

    For more information contact Dr David Blondeau-Patisssier (CSIRO, David.Blondeau-Patissier@csiro.au), Dr Daniel Harris (SEES UQ daniel.harris@uq.edu.au) or Dr Scott N. Lieske (scott.lieske@uq.edu.au, SEES UQ)

  • Mapping sub-surface water quality parameters (organic matter, phytoplankton and detritus concentrations) in the Great Barrier Reef and Northern Australia tropical waters from a large dataset of in situ spectrophotometer measurements.

    Project Summary

    A large dataset of water column profiles (and continuous surface transects) of water quality parameters, collected from in situ spectrophotometers deployed routinely at sampling stations during field campaigns, has been collected by the CSIRO Aquatic Remote Sensing group over the years. Data were sampled in the waters of the Great Barrier Reef lagoon and northern territory at various locations and seasons. Data collected within the first ~3 m of these profiles has been used to derive relationships for the surface waters, in relation with ocean colour satellite algorithms. A parameter in particular, the total absorption coefficient, was mostly used. But other parameters are available from these profiles, such as the phytoplankton and organic matter absorption coefficients, and at various depths – what story do they tell us? What contributes more to water attenuation: organic matter, phytoplankton or detritus?

    Project Background

    This research project will first help assess how measurements from these in situ spectrophotometers compare to filter pads for parameters other than the total absorption coefficient. Often dismissed, this assessment will help make use of these measurements more routinely. Secondly, measurements at depths below -3m are dismissed because ocean colour remote sensing satellite data is often unable to provide information below the top surface layer. However this information may provide further insights into how the use of in situ profile measurements can complement satellite imagery of the lagoon’s surface waters with the dynamics of the phytoplankton and dissolved organic materials at various depths.

    For more information contact Dr David Blondeau-Patisssier (CSIRO, David.Blondeau-Patissier@csiro.au), Dr Daniel Harris (SEES UQ daniel.harris@uq.edu.au) or Dr Scott N. Lieske (scott.lieske@uq.edu.au, SEES UQ)