Professor Paul Hodges

Prof&NHMRC Snr Principal Res Fel

School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences
Faculty of Health and Behavioural Sciences
p.hodges@uq.edu.au
+61 7 336 52008

Overview

Paul W. Hodges DSc MedDr PhD BPhty(Hons) FAA FACP APAM(Hon) is an National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC) Senior Principal Research Fellow, Professor and Director of the NHMRC Centre for Clinical Research Excellence in Spinal Pain, Injury and Health at The University of Queensland (UQ). He is lead chief investigator on an NHMRC Program Grant that includes colleagues from the Universities of Melbourne and Sydney. Paul is a Fellow of the Australian Academy of Science, which is a Fellowship of the nation’s most distinguished scientists, elected by their peers for outstanding research that has pushed back the frontiers of knowledge. He is also a Fellow of the Australian College of Physiotherapists and was made an Honoured member of the Australian Physiotherapy Association, their highest honour.

Paul is a recognised world leader in movement control, pain and rehabilitation. His unique comprehensive research approach from molecular biology to brain physiology and human function has led to discoveries that have transformed understanding of why people move differently in pain. His innovative research has also led to discoveries of changes in neuromuscular function across a diverse range of conditions from incontinence to breathing disorders. These observations have been translated into effective treatments that have been tested and implemented internationally.

Paul has received numerous national and international research awards that span basic and clinical science. These include the premier international award for spine research (ISSLS Prize) on four occasions; three times in Basic Science (2006, 2011, 2019) and once in Clinical Science (2018). International awards in basic science include the SusanneKlein-Vogelbach Award (2010) and the Delsys Prize for Innovation in Electromyography (2009). National medical research awards include the NHMRC Achievement Award (2011). He has also received national community-based leadership awards including the Young Australian of the Year Award in Science and Technology (1997), Future Summit Australian Leadership Award (2010), and Emerging Leader Award (Next 100 Awards, 2009).

Paul is a past president of the International Society for Electrophysiology and Kinesiology and has been the Chair/Co-Chair for several major international conferences. He has led major international consortia to bring together leaders from multiple disciplines to understand pain.

Research Interests

  • Motor control
  • Pain
  • Rehabilitation
  • Continence
  • Low back pain

Research Impacts

Paul has three doctorates; one in Physiotherapy and two in Neuroscience. His work aims to blend these skills to understand mechanisms, and use that knowledge to develop and refine interventions. His diverse expertise enables him to solve complex problems using a comprehensive multi-scale approach from molecular biology to brain physiology and human function, using innovative experimental methods. His comprehensive research approach has led to discoveries that have transformed understanding of why people move differently in pain. Translation of this work into treatments for people in pain have changed rehabilitation and improved outcomes, particularly for back pain; the world’s leading cause of disability. In addition to his work in pain his unique approach has led to breakthroughs in other areas such as management of continence and breathing disorders.

Qualifications

  • Doctor of Science, The University of Queensland
  • Doctor of Medicine, Karolinska Mediko kirurgiska Institutet
  • PhD, The University of Queensland
  • Bachelor of Physiotherapy, The University of Queensland

Publications

View all Publications

Supervision

View all Supervision

Publications

Book

Book Chapter

  • Hodges, Paul W. (2016). Motor control and pain. In Kathleen A. Sluka (Ed.), Mechanisms and management of pain for the physical therapist 2nd ed. (pp. 67-82) Philadelphia, United States: Wolters Kluwer Health Adis (ESP).

  • Danneels, L. and Hodges, P. W. (2015). Low back pain characteristics and changes in lumbar muscle structure. In Thomas Graven-Nielsen and Lars Arendt-Nielsen (Ed.), Musculoskeletal pain: basic mechanisms and implications (pp. 1-1) Washington, DC, United States: Wolters Kluwer Health Adis (ESP).

  • Hodges, Paul W. , Falla, Deborah and Schabrun, Siobhan (2015). Reorganized motor control at cortical, subcortical, and spinal levels in neck and low back pain. In Thomas Graven-Nielsen and Lars Arendt-Nielsen (Ed.), Musculoskeletal pain: basic mechanisms and implications (pp. 1-1) Washington, DC, United States: IASP Press.

  • Hodges, Paul W. (2013). Adaptation and rehabilitation: from motoneurones to motor cortex and behaviour. In Paul W. Hodges, Jacek Cholewicki and Jaap H. van Dieën (Ed.), The Rehabilitation of Back Pain (pp. 59-73) UK: Elsevier. doi:10.1016/B978-0-7020-4356-7.00006-9

  • Hodges, Paul W., van Dillen, Linda R., McGill, Stuart, Brumagne, Simon, Hides, Julie A. and Moseley, G. Lorimer (2013). Integrated clinical approach to motor control interventions in low back and pelvic pain. In Paul W. Hodges, Jacek Cholewicki and Jaap H. van Dieën (Ed.), Spinal Control: The Rehabilitation of Back Pain (pp. 243-310) UK: Elsevier. doi:10.1016/B978-0-7020-4356-7.00021-5

  • Hodges, Paul W., van Dieën, Jaap H. and Cholewicki, Jacek (2013). Introduction: convergence and divergence of opinions on spinal control. In Paul W. Hodges, Jacek Cholewicki and Jaap H. van Dieën (Ed.), Spinal control: the rehabilitation of back pain (pp. 1-4) London, United Kingdom: Elsevier. doi:10.1016/B978-0-7020-4356-7.00001-X

  • van Dieën, Jaap H., Moseley, G. Lorimer and Hodges, Paul W. (2013). Motor control changes and low back pain: cause or effect?. In Paul W. Hodges, Jacek Cholewicki and Jaap H. van Dieën (Ed.), Spinal Control: The Rehabilitation of Back Pain (pp. 207-217) UK: Elsevier. doi:10.1016/B978-0-7020-4356-7.00018-5

  • Hodges, Paul W., McGill, Stuart and Hides, Julie A. (2013). Motor control of the spine and changes in pain: debate about the extrapolation from research observations of motor control strategies to effective treatments for back pain. In Paul W. Hodges, Jacek Cholewicki and Jaap H. van Dieën (Ed.), Spinal Control: The Rehabilitation of Back Pain (pp. 231-242) UK: Elsevier. doi:10.1016/B978-0-7020-4356-7.00020-3

  • Hodges, Paul and Vicenzino, Bill (2011). Motor and sensorimotor deficits and likely impact of Mobilisation with Movement. In Mobilisation with Movement: The art and the science (pp. 93-100) Chatswood, NSW, Australia: Elsevier Australia.

  • Hodges, P., Ferreira, P. H. and Ferreira, M. L. (2009). Lumbar Spine: Treatment of instability and disorders of movement control. In Magee, D. J., Zachazewski, J. E. and Quillen, W. S. (Ed.), Pathology and Intervention in Musculoskeletal Rehabilitation 1st ed. (pp. 389-425) United States: Elsevier.

  • Hodges, P. W. (2008). Changes in Sensorimotor Control in Low Back Pain. In Graven-Nielsen, T., Arendt-Nielsen, L. and Mense, S. (Ed.), Fundamentals of Musculoskeletal Pain (pp. 445-459) Seattle, USA: IASP Press.

  • Urquhart, Donna M. and Hodges, Paul W. (2007). Clinical anatomy of the anterolateral abdominal muscles. In Movement, Stability & Lumbopelvic Pain (pp. 75-84) : Elsevier Ltd. doi:10.1016/B978-044310178-6.50006-2

  • Urquhart, D. and Hodges, P. W. (2007). Clinical anatomy of the anterlateral abdominal muscles. In Vleeming, A., Mooney, V. and Stoekhart, R. (Ed.), Movement, Stability and Lumbopelvic Pain: Integration of Research and Therapy 2nd ed. (pp. 75-84) Edinburgh: Churchill Livingstone.

  • Hodges, P. W. and Cholewicki, J. (2007). Functional control of the spine. In Vleeming, A., Mooney, V. and Stockhart, R. (Ed.), Movement, Stability and Lumbopelvic Pain: Integration of Research and Therapy 2nd ed. (pp. 489-512) Edinburgh: Churchill Livingstone. doi:10.1016/B978-044310178-6.50035-9

  • Hodges, P. and Janda, V. (2006). Functional control of the back. In C. Morris (Ed.), Low Back Syndromes: Integrated Clinical Management (pp. 119-146) Sydney: McGraw-Hill, Medical Publishing Division.

  • Hodges, Paul W. (2006). Low back pain and the pelvic floor. In Beate Carriere and Cynthia Markel Feldt (Ed.), The pelvic floor (pp. 81-97) Stuttgart, Germany: Thieme.

  • Hodges, P and Jull, G A (2006). Spinal segmental stabilization training. In C.Liebenson (Ed.), Rehabilitation of the Spine 2nd ed. (pp. 585-611) Baltimore: Lippencott, Williams & Wilkins.

  • Hodges, P. (2004). Abdominal mechanism and support for the lumbar spine and pelvis. In C. Richardson, P.W. Hodges and J. Hides (Ed.), Therapeutic Exercise for Lumbopelvic Stablization: A Motor Control Approach for the Treatment and Prevention of Low Back Pain 2nd ed. (pp. 31-57) Edinburgh, UK: Churchill Livingstone.

  • Hodges, P. (2004). Abdominal mechanisms in low back pain. In C. Richardson, P. W. Hodges and J. Hides (Ed.), Therapeutic Exercise for Lumbopelvic Stabilization: A Motor Control Approach for the Treatment and Prevention of Low Back Pain 2nd ed. (pp. 141-148) Edinburgh, UK: Churchill Livingstone.

  • Hodges, P. (2004). Chronic low back and coccygeal pain. In M.A. Jones and D.A. Rivett (Ed.), Clinical Reasoning for Manual Therapists (pp. 103-122) Philadelphia, USA: Butterworth Heinemann. doi:10.1016/B978-0-7506-3906-4.50012-5

  • Moseley, L. and Hodges, P. (2004). Chronic pain and motor control. In J. D. Boyling and G. A. Jull (Ed.), Grieve's Modern Manual Therapy 3rd ed. (pp. 215-231) New York: Churchill Livingstone - Elsevier Science.

  • Rainoldi, A., Casale, R., Hodges, P. and Jull, G. A. (2004). EMG applications in rehabilitation medicine and related fields. In Roberto Merletti and Philip Parker (Ed.), Electomyography: Physiology, engineering and non-invasive applications (pp. 403-433) John Wiley & Sons Inc. Hoboken New Jersey: IEEE.

  • Hides, J. A., Richardson, C. A. and Hodges, P. (2004). Local segmental control. In C. Richardson, P.W. Hodges and J. Hides (Ed.), Therapeutic Exercise for Lumbopelvic Stablization: A Motor Control Approach for the Treatment and Prevention of Low Back Pain 2nd ed ed. (pp. 185-219) Edinburgh, UK: Churchill Livingstone.

  • Hodges, P. (2004). Lumbopelvic stability : A functional model of the biomechanics and motor control of lumbopelvic stability. In C. Richardson, P.W. Hodges and J. Hides (Ed.), Therapeutic Exercise for Lumbopelvic Stablization: A Motor Control Approach for the Treatment and Prevention of Low Back Pain 2nd ed. (pp. 13-28) Edinburgh, UK: Churchill Livingstone.

  • Hodges, P. (2004). Motor control of the trunk. In J. D. Boyling and G. A. Jull (Ed.), Grieve's Modern Manual Therapy 3rd ed. (pp. 119-139) Edinburgh, UK: Churchill Livingstone - Elsevier Science.

  • Hodges, P. (2004). Pain models. In C. Richardson, P.W. Hodges and J. Hides (Ed.), Therapeutic Exercise for Lumbopelvic Stablization: A Motor Control Approach for the Treatment and Prevention of Low Back Pain 2nd ed. (pp. 129-137) Edinburgh, UK: Churchill Livingstone.

  • Richardson, C. A., Hides, J. A. and Hodges, P. (2004). Principles of the 'segmental stabilization' exercise model. In C. Richardson, P. W. Hodges and J. Hides (Ed.), Therapeutic Exercise for Lumbopelvic Stablization: A Motor Control Approach for the Treatment and Prevention of Low Back Pain 2nd ed. (pp. 175-183) Edinburgh, UK: Churchill Livingstone.

  • Hodges, Paul W. (2003). Motor control. In Gregory S. Kolt and Lynn Snyder-Mackler (Ed.), Physical therapies in sport and exercise 2nd ed. (pp. 115-132) Edinburgh, U.K.: Churchill Livingstone.

Journal Article

Conference Publication

Edited Outputs

Other Outputs

Grants (Administered at UQ)

PhD and MPhil Supervision

Current Supervision

  • Doctor Philosophy — Principal Advisor

    Other advisors:

  • Doctor Philosophy — Principal Advisor

  • Doctor Philosophy — Principal Advisor

    Other advisors:

  • Doctor Philosophy — Principal Advisor

    Other advisors:

  • Doctor Philosophy — Principal Advisor

    Other advisors:

  • Doctor Philosophy — Principal Advisor

  • Doctor Philosophy — Principal Advisor

    Other advisors:

  • Doctor Philosophy — Associate Advisor

  • Doctor Philosophy — Associate Advisor

    Other advisors:

  • Doctor Philosophy — Associate Advisor

  • Doctor Philosophy — Associate Advisor

Completed Supervision