Professor Peter Sly

Professor

Child Health Research Centre
Faculty of Medicine
p.sly@uq.edu.au
+61 7 3069 7383

Overview

Professor Peter Sly is the Director, Children's Health and Environment Program and Director, WHO Collaborating Centre for Children's Health and Environment. Professor Sly is a NHMRC Senior Principal Research Fellow and a paediatric respiratory physician with extensive research experience in respiratory physiology, developmental immunology and children's environmental health. Professor Sly’s research aims to understand the mechanisms underlying chronic childhood lung diseases in order to improve clinical management and to delay or prevent their onset, with consequent reductions in adult lung diseases. A combination of basic science, longitudinal cohort studies and translation of research findings into clinical practice, including clinical trials, are included in three main areas: asthma, cystic fibrosis and children’s environmental health

Professor Sly is the chairman of the board of directors for the Pacific Basin Consortium for the Environment and Health and currently serves on International Advisory Boards and committees, including: WHO Public Health and Environment; WHO network of Collaborating Centres in Children’s Environmental Health; Canadian Healthy Infant Longitudinal Development (CHILD) Study, Canada; and the Infant Lung Health Study, Paarl, South Africa.

Research Interests

  • Asthma
    Understanding mechanisms that underlie risks for developing asthma in susceptible children
  • Cystic Fibrosis
    Understanding the mechanisms underlying the development of lung disease early in life and why and how this progresses
  • Impact of environmental exposures in early life
    Improving methods of assessing environmental exposures during fetal development and in early postnatal life. Improving methods for assessing the effects of early life environmental exposures and understanding how these increase long-tern risk of chronic disease.

Qualifications

  • Doctor of Medicine, University of Melbourne
  • Doctor of Science, The University of Western Australia
  • Bachlor of Medicine and Surgery, University of Melbourne

Publications

  • Landrigan, Philip J., Fuller, Richard, Fisher, Samantha, Suk, William A., Sly, Peter, Chiles, Thomas C. and Bose-O'Reilly, Stephan (2019) Pollution and children's health. Science of the Total Environment, 650 Pt 2: 2389-2394. doi:10.1016/j.scitotenv.2018.09.375

  • Teo, Shu Mei, Tang, Howard H. F., Mok, Danny, Judd, Louise M., Watts, Stephen C., Pham, Kym, Holt, Barbara J., Kusel, Merci, Serralha, Michael, Troy, Niamh, Bochkov, Yury A., Grindle, Kristine, Lemanske, Robert F., Johnston, Sebastian L., Gern, James E., Sly, Peter D., Holt, Patrick G., Holt, Kathryn E. and Inouye, Michael (2018) Airway microbiota dynamics uncover a critical window for interplay of pathogenic bacteria and allergy in childhood respiratory disease. Cell Host and Microbe, 24 3: 341-352.e5. doi:10.1016/j.chom.2018.08.005

  • Luo, Lin, Wall, Adam A., Tong, Samuel J., Hung, Yu, Xiao, Zhijian, Tarique, Abdullah A., Sly, Peter D., Fantino, Emmanuelle, Marzolo, María-Paz and Stow, Jennifer L. (2018) TLR crosstalk activates LRP1 to recruit Rab8a and PI3Kγ for suppression of inflammatory responses. Cell Reports, 24 11: 3033-3044. doi:10.1016/j.celrep.2018.08.028

View all Publications

Supervision

View all Supervision

Available Projects

  • This project is available as part of a collaborative research venture between the Child Health Research Centre UQ and the Menzies Health Institute Queensland, Griffith University.

    Infants frequently experience symptoms of respiratory infections during the first two years of life. Although viruses account for most cases of respiratory tract infections, bacteria such as Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae, and Moraxella catarrhalis are often implicated in the more severe infection episodes. Although these bacteria have been studied comprehensively when they result in illness requiring hospitalisation, the natural histories of their colonisation in otherwise healthy children has not been so well researched. The ORChID birth cohort study is one of the largest community-based cohorts of its type. This dynamic birth cohort and its data are extraordinary in that parents collected 11,215 weekly nasal and faecal swabs until two years of age from 158 children. In addition, each child’s parents maintained a daily symptom diary during the same period providing >88,000 child-days of observation. The ORChID cohort has already produced valuable new information on the natural history of viral pathogens, and their relationship to childhood respiratory symptoms. The proposed PhD aims to add to our understanding of the dynamic nature of colonisation by bacteria of the nasal space in healthy infants during the first two years of life, including identifying factors that may influence colonisation, lead to respiratory infections, and to investigate the importance of specific bacterial/viral interactions.

    Prospective students may contact me, Dr Stephen Lambert (sblambert@uq.edu.au), Professor Keith Grimwood (k.grimwood@griffith.edu.au) or Professor Robert Ware (r.ware@griffith.edu.au). Enrolment at either university is acceptable.

  • This project is available as part of a collaborative research venture between the Child Health

    Research Centre UQ and the Menzies Health Institute Queensland, Griffith University.

    Infants frequently experience symptoms of acute gastroenteritis during the first two years of life. Although viruses, such as rotavirus and norovirus account for most cases of gastrointestinal tract infections in young children, bacterial pathogens such as non-typhoidal Salmonella and Campylobacter, and selected protozoa, including Giardia and Cryptosporidia are also often implicated. Despite these enteric pathogens having been studied extensively in outbreaks or illnesses resulting in hospitalisation, the epidemiology and disease burden caused by these infectious agents in a community setting in otherwise healthy children is less well researched. This is especially true now that rotavirus vaccines have been included in the national immunisation schedule. Furthermore, whether enteric agents such as Clostridia difficile, Dientamoeba fragilis and Blastocystis hominis that are detected frequently in the stools of young children are genuine pathogens remains controversial. The ORChID birth cohort study is one of the largest community-based cohorts of its type. This birth cohort and its data are extraordinary in that parents collected 11,215 weekly nasal and faecal swabs until two years of age from 158 children. In addition, each child’s parents maintained a daily symptom diary during the same period providing >88,000 child-days of observation. The ORChID cohort has already produced valuable new information on the natural history of viral respiratory pathogens, and their relationship to childhood respiratory symptoms. The proposed PhD aims to add to our understanding of the causes of gastrointestinal infections in healthy infants during the first two years of life in the post-rotavirus vaccine era, including identifying enteric organisms that act as genuine pathogens, as well as factors that may influence infection and lead to gastrointestinal illness.

    Prospective students may contact me, Dr Stephen Lambert (sblambert@uq.edu.au), Professor Keith Grimwood (k.grimwood@griffith.edu.au) or Professor Robert Ware (r.ware@griffith.edu.au). Enrolment at either university is acceptable.

View all Available Projects

Publications

Book

  • Wilmott, Robert William, Bush, Andrew, Deterding, Robin, Ratjen, Felix, Sly, Peter, Zar, Heather J. and Faro, Albert Kendig's disorders of the respiratory tract in children. Elsevier Inc., 2018.

  • Pediatric respiratory medicine. Edited by L. M. Taussig, L. I. Landau, LeSouef, P. N., Martinez, F. D., Morgan, W. J. and Sly, P. D. St Louis, USA: Mosby, 1999.

  • Infant Respiratory Function Testing. Edited by J. Stocks, P. D. Sly, R. S. Tepper and W. J. Morgan New York: John Wiley & Sons, 1996.

Book Chapter

  • Sly, Peter and Bush, Andrew (2018). Environmental contributions to respiratory disease in children. In Kendig's disorders of the respiratory tract in children (pp. 49-56.e3) Philadelphia, PA, United States: Elsevier Inc.. doi:10.1016/B978-0-323-44887-1.00004-3

  • Bush, Andrew and Sly, Peter (2018). Long-term consequences of childhood respiratory disease. In Kendig's disorders of the respiratory tract in children (pp. 247-256.e4) Philadelphia, PA, United States: Elsevier Inc.. doi:10.1016/B978-0-323-44887-1.00015-8

  • Holgate, Stephen T. and Sly, Peter D. (2013). Asthma Pathogenesis. In Adkinson, N., Bochner, Bruce, Burks, A., Busse, William, Holgate, Stephen, Lemanske, Robert and O'Hehir, Robyn (Ed.), Middleton's Allergy: Principles and Practice 8 ed. (pp. 812-841) Philadelphia, PA., United States: Elsevier. doi:10.1016/B978-0-323-08593-9.00051-6

  • Sly, Peter D. and Jones, Carmen M. (2012). New and future developments of therapy for asthma in children. In Kai-Håkon Carlsen and Jorrit Gerritsen (Ed.), Paediatric Asthma (pp. 224-234) Lausanne, Switzerland: European Respiratory Society. doi:10.1183/1025448x.10018310

  • Sly, P. D., Kusel, M., Franklin, P. and Holt, P. G. (2011). Environmental factors in children’s asthma and respiratory effects. In Jerome O. Nriagu (Ed.), Encyclopedia of environmental health (pp. 367-379) Amsterdam, Netherlands: Elsevier Science. doi:10.1016/B978-0-444-52272-6.00018-0

  • Calogero, C. and Sly, P. D. (2010). Developmental physiology : Lung function during growth and development from birth to old age. In Paediatric lung function (pp. 1-15) Shieffield, United Kingdom: European Respiratory Society. doi:10.1183/1025448x.00011109

  • Sly, Peter D. and Morgan, Wayne J. (2008). Respiratory Function Testing in Infants and Preschool-Aged Children. In Pediatric Respiratory Medicine (pp. 163-169) : Elsevier Inc.. doi:10.1016/B978-032304048-8.50016-5

  • Sly, Peter and Collins, Rachel A. (2008). Applied clinical respiratory physiology. In Lynn M. Taussig, Louis I. Landau, Peter N. Le Souëf, Fernando D. Martinez, Wayne J. Morgan and Peter D. Sly (Ed.), Pediatric respiratory medicine 2nd ed. (pp. 73-88) Philadelphia PA: Mosby/Elsevier.

  • Sly, Peter, Holt, Patrick G., Stein, Renato T. and Martinez, Fernando D. (2008). Disease mechanisms and cell biology. In Lynn M. Taussig, Louis I. Landau, Peter N. Le Souëf, Fernando D. Martinez, Wayne J. Morgan and Peter D. Sly (Ed.), Pediatric respiratory medicine 2nd ed. (pp. 791-804) Philadelphia PA: Mosby/ Elsevier.

  • Sly, Peter, Collins, Rachel A. and Morgan, Wayne J. (2008). Lung function in cooperative subjects. In Lynn M. Taussig, Louis I. Landau, Peter N. Le Souëf, Fernando D. Martinez, Wayne J. Morgan and Peter D. Sly (Ed.), Pediatric respiratory medicine 2nd ed. (pp. 171-178) Philadelphia PA: Mosby/ Elsevier.

  • Sly, Peter and Morgan, Wayne J. (2008). Respiratory function testing in infants and preschool children. In Lynn M. Taussig, Louis I. Landau, Peter N. Le Souëf, Fernando D. Martinez, Wayne J. Morgan and Peter D. Sly (Ed.), Pediatric respiratory medicine 2nd ed. (pp. 163-170) Philadelphia PA: Mosby/ Elsevier.

  • Holt, Patrick G., Sly, Peter and Devereux, Graham (2006). Early life origins of allergy and asthma. In Stephen T. Holgate, Martin K. Church and Lawrence M. Lichtenstein (Ed.), Allergy 3rd ed. (pp. 223-231) Philadelphia, PA , United States: Mosby Elsevier.

  • Douglas T and Sly, Peter (2006). Unique biological characteristics of children; Developmental stage-specific susceptibilities and outcomes in children. In Principles for evaluating health risks in children associated with exposure to chemicals (pp. 22-128) Geneva: World Health Organisation.

  • Sly, Peter and Flack, F. S. (2005). Monitoring childhood asthma. In Peter G. Gibson (Ed.), Monitoring asthma (pp. 363-382) Boca Raton, U.S.: Taylor & Francis.

  • Sly, Peter, Flack, F. S. and Hantos, Z. (2005). Respiratory mechanics in infants and children. In Outayba Hamid, Joanne Shannon and James Martin (Ed.), The physiological basis of respiratory disease (pp. 49-54) Hamilton, Ontario, Canada: B.C. Decker.

  • Burton, Paul, Gurrin, Lyle and Sly, Peter (2004). Extending the simple linear regression model to account for correlated responses: An introduction to generalized estimating equations and multilevel mixed modelling. In Ralph B. D'Agostino (Ed.), Tutorials in biostatistics (pp. 1-33) Chichester, West Sussex, United Kingdom: John Wiley & Sons. doi:10.1002/0470023724

Journal Article

Conference Publication

Grants (Administered at UQ)

PhD and MPhil Supervision

Current Supervision

  • Doctor Philosophy — Principal Advisor

  • Doctor Philosophy — Principal Advisor

  • Doctor Philosophy — Principal Advisor

  • Doctor Philosophy — Principal Advisor

  • Doctor Philosophy — Associate Advisor

    Other advisors:

  • Doctor Philosophy — Associate Advisor

    Other advisors:

  • Doctor Philosophy — Associate Advisor

  • Doctor Philosophy — Associate Advisor

    Other advisors:

  • Doctor Philosophy — Associate Advisor

    Other advisors:

  • Doctor Philosophy — Associate Advisor

  • Doctor Philosophy — Associate Advisor

    Other advisors:

  • Doctor Philosophy — Associate Advisor

Completed Supervision

Possible Research Projects

Note for students: The possible research projects listed on this page may not be comprehensive or up to date. Always feel free to contact the staff for more information, and also with your own research ideas.

  • This project is available as part of a collaborative research venture between the Child Health Research Centre UQ and the Menzies Health Institute Queensland, Griffith University.

    Infants frequently experience symptoms of respiratory infections during the first two years of life. Although viruses account for most cases of respiratory tract infections, bacteria such as Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae, and Moraxella catarrhalis are often implicated in the more severe infection episodes. Although these bacteria have been studied comprehensively when they result in illness requiring hospitalisation, the natural histories of their colonisation in otherwise healthy children has not been so well researched. The ORChID birth cohort study is one of the largest community-based cohorts of its type. This dynamic birth cohort and its data are extraordinary in that parents collected 11,215 weekly nasal and faecal swabs until two years of age from 158 children. In addition, each child’s parents maintained a daily symptom diary during the same period providing >88,000 child-days of observation. The ORChID cohort has already produced valuable new information on the natural history of viral pathogens, and their relationship to childhood respiratory symptoms. The proposed PhD aims to add to our understanding of the dynamic nature of colonisation by bacteria of the nasal space in healthy infants during the first two years of life, including identifying factors that may influence colonisation, lead to respiratory infections, and to investigate the importance of specific bacterial/viral interactions.

    Prospective students may contact me, Dr Stephen Lambert (sblambert@uq.edu.au), Professor Keith Grimwood (k.grimwood@griffith.edu.au) or Professor Robert Ware (r.ware@griffith.edu.au). Enrolment at either university is acceptable.

  • This project is available as part of a collaborative research venture between the Child Health

    Research Centre UQ and the Menzies Health Institute Queensland, Griffith University.

    Infants frequently experience symptoms of acute gastroenteritis during the first two years of life. Although viruses, such as rotavirus and norovirus account for most cases of gastrointestinal tract infections in young children, bacterial pathogens such as non-typhoidal Salmonella and Campylobacter, and selected protozoa, including Giardia and Cryptosporidia are also often implicated. Despite these enteric pathogens having been studied extensively in outbreaks or illnesses resulting in hospitalisation, the epidemiology and disease burden caused by these infectious agents in a community setting in otherwise healthy children is less well researched. This is especially true now that rotavirus vaccines have been included in the national immunisation schedule. Furthermore, whether enteric agents such as Clostridia difficile, Dientamoeba fragilis and Blastocystis hominis that are detected frequently in the stools of young children are genuine pathogens remains controversial. The ORChID birth cohort study is one of the largest community-based cohorts of its type. This birth cohort and its data are extraordinary in that parents collected 11,215 weekly nasal and faecal swabs until two years of age from 158 children. In addition, each child’s parents maintained a daily symptom diary during the same period providing >88,000 child-days of observation. The ORChID cohort has already produced valuable new information on the natural history of viral respiratory pathogens, and their relationship to childhood respiratory symptoms. The proposed PhD aims to add to our understanding of the causes of gastrointestinal infections in healthy infants during the first two years of life in the post-rotavirus vaccine era, including identifying enteric organisms that act as genuine pathogens, as well as factors that may influence infection and lead to gastrointestinal illness.

    Prospective students may contact me, Dr Stephen Lambert (sblambert@uq.edu.au), Professor Keith Grimwood (k.grimwood@griffith.edu.au) or Professor Robert Ware (r.ware@griffith.edu.au). Enrolment at either university is acceptable.