Professor Julie Henry

ARC Future Fellowship

School of Psychology
Faculty of Health and Behavioural Sciences

Affiliate Professor

Mater Research Institute-UQ
Faculty of Medicine

Affiliate Professor

Queensland Brain Institute
julie.henry@uq.edu.au
+61 7 336 56737

Overview

Henry is an ARC Future Fellow and Professor in the School of Psychology at The University of Queensland, and is also an Affiliate Professor at The Queensland Brain Institute as well as The Mater Research Institute. Henry is a Fellow of the Academy of the Social Sciences in Australia, and of the Association for Psychological Science.

Henry leads a group that particularly focuses on how social cognition and prospection are disrupted by normal adult ageing and clinical illness. Social cognition broadly refers to the processing of social information, such as the ability to recognise facial emotions, and to appropriately attend to eye gaze cues. Prospection refers to future-oriented cognitions and behaviours, such as prospective memory and episodic foresight. Henry's work has provided important insights into when and why these critical cognitive abilities break down, and the types of interventions that can be used to generate meaningful gains in these cognitive abilities. Reflecting the importance of this work, Henry has published more than 190 peer‑reviewed papers in her career to date. These publications appear in high impact outlets that include Cognition, Cortex, Developmental Science, Psychology and Aging, Emotion, Brain, Neuroscience and Biobehavioral Reviews, and Nature Reviews Neurology. Henry’s research has already been cited more than 13,000 times in Scopus with Google Scholar listing more than 24,000 citations.

Henry has also received continuous prestigious and highly competitive research funding: ~$7m to date. This has included leading seven major Australian Research Council Project Grants. Since 2016 alone, she has been the recipient of an ARC Future Fellowship ($965K), an ARC Discovery Project Grant ($645K), a UK Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) grant (£500K), an NHMRC Boosting Dementia Research grant ($700K), and an ARC Linkage Grant ($461K).

Between 2011 and 2017, Henry was Editor in Chief of the British Journal of Clinical Psychology. She is also currently an Associate Editor for Gerontology, and serves on a number of editorial boards. In 2016 Prof Henry was the recipient of the UQ Research Higher Degree Supervision Award from the Faculty of Health and Behavioural Sciences: competitive across the Faculty’s six schools and three research centres. This was in recognition of the excellent outcomes her PhD students have achieved. This includes postdoctoral positions at Harvard Medical School (three recent graduates) and The University of Cambridge.

Qualifications

  • Master of Arts, University of Aberdeen
  • Doctor of Philosophy, University of Aberdeen

Publications

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Grants

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Supervision

  • Doctor Philosophy

  • Doctor Philosophy

  • Doctor Philosophy

View all Supervision

Available Projects

  • A number of exciting PhD projects are available in the fields of cognitive ageing and social neuroscience. If you are interested in learning more, please contact Professor Henry directly.

View all Available Projects

Publications

Featured Publications

Book Chapter

  • Haines, Simon J., Shelton, Jill Talley, Henry, Julie D., Terrett, Gill, Vorwerk, Thomas and Rendell, Peter G. (2019). Prospective memory and cognitive aging. Oxford research encyclopedia of psychology. (pp. 1-25) Oxford, United Kingdom: Oxford University Press. doi: 10.1093/acrefore/9780190236557.013.381

  • Kalokerinos, Elise K., von Hippel, William and Henry, Julie D. (2017). Social cognition and aging. Encyclopedia of geropsychology. (pp. 2168-2174) Singapore: Springer Singapore. doi: 10.1007/978-981-287-082-7_2

  • Kalokerinos, Elise K., von Hippel, William and Henry, Julie D. (2015). Social cognition and aging. Encyclopedia of geropsychology. (pp. 1-7) Singapore: Springer Singapore. doi: 10.1007/978-981-287-080-3_2-1

  • Phillips, Louise H., Slessor, Gillian, Bailey, Phoebe E. and Henry, Julie D. (2014). Older adults' perception of social and emotional cues. The Oxford Handbook of Emotion, Social Cognition, and Problem Solving in Adulthood. (pp. 9-25) edited by Paul Verhaeghen and Christopher K. Hertzog. New York, NY, USA: Oxford University Press. doi: 10.1093/oxfordhb/9780199899463.001.0001

  • Crawford, John R. and Henry, Julie D. (2012). Assessment of executive dysfunction. The effectiveness of rehabilitation for cognitive deficits. (pp. 233-244) edited by Peter W. Halligan and Derick T. Wade. Oxford, United Kingdom: Oxford University Press. doi: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198526544.003.0019

  • von Hippel, William and Henry, Julie D. (2012). Social cognitive aging. The SAGE handbook of social cognition. (pp. 390-411) edited by Susan T. Fiske and C. Neil Macrae. Los Angeles, CA, United States: Sage Publications. doi: 10.4135/9781446247631.n20

  • Phillips, Louise H. and Henry, Julie D. (2011). Adult aging and executive functioning. Executive Functions and the Frontal Lobes: A Lifespan Perspective. (pp. 57-79) Taylor and Francis. doi: 10.4324/9780203837863

  • von Hippel, William and Henry, Julie D. (2011). Aging and self-regulation. Handbook of self-Regulation: Research, theory, and applications. (pp. 321-335) edited by Kathleen D. Vohs and Roy F. Baumeister. New York, United States: Guilford Press.

  • Phillips, Louise H., Henry, Julie D. and Martin, Mike (2007). Adult aging and prospective memory: The importance of ecological validity. Prospective Memory: Cognitive, Neuroscience, Developmental, and Applied Perspectives. (pp. 161-185) New York, NY United States: Taylor and Francis. doi: 10.4324/9780203809945

  • Phillips, Louise H. and Henry, Julie D. (2005). An evaluation of the frontal lobe theory of cognitive aging. Measuring the Mind Speed, control, and age. (pp. 1-28) Oxford, United Kingdom: Oxford University Press. doi: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198566427.003.0008

Journal Article

Conference Publication

Other Outputs

Grants (Administered at UQ)

PhD and MPhil Supervision

Current Supervision

Completed Supervision

Possible Research Projects

Note for students: The possible research projects listed on this page may not be comprehensive or up to date. Always feel free to contact the staff for more information, and also with your own research ideas.

  • A number of exciting PhD projects are available in the fields of cognitive ageing and social neuroscience. If you are interested in learning more, please contact Professor Henry directly.