Professor Annemaree Carroll

Associate Dean (Research)

Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences

Affiliate Professor

Centre for Youth Substance Abuse
Faculty of Health and Behavioural Sciences

Affiliate Professor

Queensland Brain Institute
a.carroll@uq.edu.au
+61 7 336 54935

Overview

Major research interests include at-risk behaviours of children and adolescents, self-regulatory intervention and prevention programs for young people, social and emotional well-being of teachers and students, self-regulation and goal setting, reputation enhancement, Attentional disorders.

Professor Annemaree Carroll is Associate Dean Research in the Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences at The University of Queensland and Professor in Educational Psychology within the School of Education. Her research activities focus on the motivational determinants underpinning children and adolescents’ educational, social and emotional outcomes and how to enhance their academic and emotional self-regulatory capacities. She is known nationally and internationally for the construction of psychometrically sound instruments for the study of self-regulatory processes and for the development of innovative and unique self-regulatory interventions for children and youth to bring about positive change in their lives. She has conceptualised and coordinated the development of the Mindfields Suite of Programs (www.mindfields.com.au), which encompass a strengths-based approach to student wellbeing that targets school-wide practices, teacher and student education and to help young people take control of their lives. She has also led a team of researchers to develop the KooLKIDS Resources (www.kool-kids.com.au), an emotion resilience program aimed to empower children to live well with themselves and others by learning social, emotional and cognitive skills that promote self-regulation and wellbeing.

Professor Carroll is a Chief Investigator and Co-ordinator of Translational Outcomes within the ARC Special Research Initiative Science of Learning Research Centre at The University of Queensland where her research is particularly focussed on understanding the impact of emotions, attention, and behaviour on learning throughout child and adolescent development, and to develop and implement strategies that can be translated into educational outcomes. Dr Carroll and her research team are collecting empirical, physiological data and developing new technologies to investigate topics including: real-time emotional states of students; regulating emotions through intervention approaches; identifying neural markers of attention readiness; and teaching foundation skills of attention control in young children. In addition to better understanding the process of learning, it is hoped that these new technologies will provide translational outcomes for classroom practice and for training the next generation of teachers.

Professor Carroll has had extensive experience in managing large-scale, school-based projects across classroom settings as well as clinic-based research in which she has excellent skills in test administration with children and adolescents. She has also been concerned with children with neurodevelopmental disorders (e.g., ADHD, Tourette Syndrome) to examine information processing tasks that may demand intact executive functioning and that require dual task performance and control of impulsive reactions.

Professor Carroll is a registered teacher and psychologist. She has experience teaching in primary and special education in Queensland and has engaged in research and higher education teaching at The University of Queensland and The University of Western Australia where she was granted a Master of Education (1991) and PhD in Educational Psychology (1995).

Research Interests

  • Self-regulatory prevention and intervention approaches
  • Attention and emotion regulation of children and adolescents
  • Reputation enhancement and social and self-identity
  • Attentional and related disorders
  • At-risk behaviours of children and adolescents

Research Impacts

Professor Carroll's current ARC Linkage funded research (2015-2018) has continued the partnership with three Queensland State High Schools to examine how embedding social and emotional wellbeing into school-wide policies, classroom practices, and self and social strategies of students enhances learning, behavioural, and social outcomes. A new model for embedding social and emotional learning into whole of schools approaches has emanated from the project. A new social and emotional learning program for senior secondary students (Mindfields Senior High school Program) which has adopted gamification principles has been developed as part of this project.This research project has emanated from a previous three year research partnership with the same schools which focused on the implementation of a model of social connectedness to improve the social well being and the emotional self-regulatory capacities of high schools students. A new social and emotional learning program for junior secondary students (Mindfields Junior High school Program) was developed as part of this project.

The recently completed ARC Discovery research (2011-2014) was concerned with the development of a new multidimensional scale (The Perth A-Loneness Scale) and the development of the KooLKIDS Whole of Class social and emotional learning program which will be implemented across primary schools in Queensland in 2015. Other Western Australian Health Promotion Foundation (Healthway) funded research (2011-2014) has concentrated on promoting positive mental health through the development of i-Connect (www.i-connect.uwa.edu.au), an interactive multimedia program for early adolescents designed to alleviate aloneness and develop self-awareness and empathy.

Research within the Science of Learning Research Centre (2013-2018) has examined the nature of attention and self-regulation in the classroom and the role of feedback in the learning of children and adolescents with typical and atypical developmental trajectories. An ARC Linkage Project (2018-2020) will continue to scale up the coaching interventions for teachers to provide timely feedback to students. New technologies in the form of real time emotion apps for teachers and students have been developed to gather data on emotional states of teachers and students in classrooms.

Qualifications

  • Doctor of Philosophy, The University of Western Australia
  • Bachelor of Science (Honours1), University of Southern Queensland
  • Master of Education, The University of Western Australia
  • Bachelor of Education, Queensland University of Technology
  • Graduate Dip. Special Education, Griffith University
  • Diploma of Teaching, Griffith University

Publications

View all Publications

Supervision

View all Supervision

Publications

Book

Book Chapter

  • Lynn, Sasha, Carroll, Annemaree, Houghton, Stephen and Bower, Julie (2019). Emotion socialization in peer groups. Encyclopaedia of child and adolescent development. (pp. 1-10) edited by S. Hupp, J. Jewell, M. Zimmer-Gembeck and A. Waters. New York, NY USA: Wiley.

  • Carroll, Annemaree, Bower, Julie M., Ashman, Adrian F. and Lynn, Sasha (2017). Early secondary high school-a mindfield® for social and emotional learning. Social and Emotional Learning in Australia and the Asia-Pacific: Perspectives, Programs and Approaches. (pp. 335-352) Gateway East, Singapore: Springer Singapore. doi: 10.1007/978-981-10-3394-0_18

  • Sanders O'Connor, Emma, Carroll, Annemaree, Houghton, Stephen and Donovan, Caroline (2016). A contemporary review of childhood antisocial behaviour in school settings. Crime and violence prevention: moving beyond hot-stove policing and perpetrator rehabilitation. (pp. 197-214) edited by Myra F. Taylor, Umneea Khan and Julie Ann Pooley. New York, NY, United States: Nova Science Publishers.

  • Houghton, Stephen, Carroll, Annemaree, O'Connor, Emma Saunders and Crow, Jedda (2016). Childhood onset conduct disorder: breaking the cycle of crime and violence early though the implementation of the Koolkids school-based interactive intervention program. Crime and violence prevention: moving beyond hot-stove policing and perpetrator rehabilitation. (pp. 177-196) edited by Myra F. Taylor, Umneea Khan and Julie Ann Pooley. New York, NY, United States: Nova Science Publishers.

  • Carroll, Annemaree, Houghton, Stephen, Durkin, Kevin and Hattie, John (2016). Reputations. Encyclopedia of Adolescence. (pp. 1-12) Cham, Switzerland: Springer International Publishing. doi: 10.1007/978-3-319-32132-5_168-2

  • Bower, Julie and Carroll, Annemaree (2015). Facts about students at risk of delinquency. Education for inclusion and diversity. (pp. 365-366) edited by Adrian Ashman. Melbourne, VIC, Australia: Pearson Australia.

  • Bower, Julie M. and Carroll, Annemaree (2014). Getting hooked on sports or the arts. Adolescence: Spaces and Places. (pp. 83-94) New York NY United States: Nova Science Publishers.

  • Carroll, Annemaree, Hemingway, Francene, Bower, Julie, Ashman, Adrian, Houghton, Stephen and Durkin, Kevin (2014). Impulsivity in juvenile delinquency: differences among early-onset, late-onset, and non-offenders. Criminal Psychology. (pp. ---) edited by David Canter. New York, NY, USA: SAGE Publications Library of Criminology.

  • Carroll, Annemaree, Houghton, Stephen, Bourgeois, Amanda, Hattie, John, Tan, Carol and Ozsoy, Asyegul (2014). Loneliness, reputational orientations and positive mental well-being during adolescence. Adolescence: Spaces and places. (pp. 7-21) edited by Myra F. Taylor, Julie Ann Pooley and Joav Merrick. New York, USA: Nova Science Publishers Inc..

  • Bourgeois, Amanda, Carroll, Annemaree and Houghton, Stephen (2013). Adolescent loneliness, reputation, and wellbeing: implications for intervention. Adolescent wellbeing: trends, issues and prospects. (pp. 93-100) edited by J.-F., Darren Pullen and Annemaree Carroll. Hobart, TAS, Australia: Australian Clearinghouse for Youth Studies.

  • J.-F., Pullen, Darren and Carroll, Annemaree (2013). Conceptualising the developmental needs of adolescents within a learning context. Adolescent wellbeing: trends, issues and prospects. (pp. 1-7) edited by J.-F., Darren Pullen and Annemaree Carroll. Hobart, TAS, Australia: Australian Clearinghouse for Youth Studies.

  • Carroll, Annemaree, Houghton, Stephen and Lynn, Sasha (2013). Friendship in school. International guide to student achievement. (pp. 70-73) edited by John Hattie and Eric M. Anderman. New York, United States: Routledge.

  • Cuskelly, Monica, Gilmore, Linda and Carroll, Annemaree (2013). Self-regulation and mastery motivation in individuals with developmental disabilities: Barriers, supports and strategies. Handbook of self-regulatory processes in development. (pp. 381-402) edited by Karen Caplovitz Barrett, Nathan A. Fox, George A. Morgan, Deborah J. Fidler and Lisa A. Daunhauer. New York, USA: Taylor and Francis.

  • Houghton, Stephen, Carroll, Annemaree, Tan, Carol and Nathan, Elijah (2013). Why do bullies bully? Reputation as a predictor of bullying. School Bullying: Predictive Factors, Coping Strategies and Effects on Mental Health. (pp. 191-210) edited by Kas Dekker and Maarten Dijkstra. New York, United States: Nova Science Publishers.

  • Rowbotham, Michelle, Cuskelly, Monica and Carroll, Annemaree (2013). Women caring for adults with intellectual disabilities. Disability and chronic disease. (pp. 121-142) edited by Joav Merrick, Shoshana Aspler and Mohammed Morad. Hauppauge, NY, United States: Nova Science Publishers.

  • Carroll, Annemaree and Houghton, Stephen (2012). Delinquency and learning disabilities. Encyclopaedia of the Sciences of Learning. (pp. 919-923) edited by Norbert .M. Seel. New York , NY, U.S.A.: Springer.

  • Carroll, Annemaree, Houghton, Stephen, Durkin, Kevin and Hattie, John (2012). Reputations.

  • Bower, Julie M. and Carroll, Annemaree (2012). Students at risk of delinquency. Education for inclusion and diversity. (pp. 360-361) edited by Adrian Ashman and John Elkins. Frenchs Forest, Australia: Pearson.

  • Tan, Carol, Houghton, Stephen and Carroll, Annemaree (2009). Understanding the delinquent activities and reputational orientations of adolescent loners and nonloners. Delinquency: causes, reduction and prevention. (pp. 101-132) edited by Ozan Sahin and Joseph Maier. New York: Nova Science Publishers.

  • Carroll, Annemaree, Bower, Julie, Hemingway, Francene and Ashman, Adrian (2007). Mindfields : A self-regulatory intervention for young people at risk who want to change their lives. The millennial adolescent. (pp. 59-64) edited by Nan Bahr and Donna Pendergast. Camberwell, Vic., Australia: ACER Press.

  • Houghton, S. and Carroll, A. (2005). Children and adolescents at risk. Educating Children with Diverse Abilities. (pp. 405-434) edited by A. Ashman and J. Elkins. Frenchs Forest, NSW: Pearson Education Australia.

  • Carroll, A., Houghton, S., Hattie, J. and Durkin, K. (2004). Comportamento anti-social nos jovens: O modelo dos objectivos de aumento da reputacao. Comportamento anit-social e crime: Da infancia a idade adulta. (pp. 215-250) edited by Antonio Castro Fonseca. Coimbra: Nova Almedina.

  • Carroll, Annemaree, Houghton, Stephen, Hattie, John and Durkin, Kevin (2001). Reputation Enhancing Goals: Integrating Reputation Enhancement and Goal Setting Theory as an Explanation of Delinquent Involvement. Advances in Psychology Research, Volume 4. (pp. 101-129) edited by Frank H. Columbus. Huntington, NY: Nova Science Publishers.

  • Carroll, A. (2000). Reputation Enhancement Scale. (pp. 762-766) edited by J. Maltby, C.A. Lewis and A.P. Hill. Lampeter, Wales: Edwin Mellen Press.

Journal Article

Conference Publication

Other Outputs

Grants (Administered at UQ)

PhD and MPhil Supervision

Current Supervision

  • Doctor Philosophy — Principal Advisor

  • Doctor Philosophy — Principal Advisor

  • Doctor Philosophy — Principal Advisor

    Other advisors:

  • Doctor Philosophy — Principal Advisor

    Other advisors:

  • Doctor Philosophy — Principal Advisor

    Other advisors:

  • Doctor Philosophy — Principal Advisor

    Other advisors:

  • Doctor Philosophy — Associate Advisor

    Other advisors:

  • Doctor Philosophy — Associate Advisor

    Other advisors:

Completed Supervision