Dr Michael Netzel

Senior Research Fellow

Centre for Nutrition and Food Sciences
Queensland Alliance for Agriculture and Food Innovation
m.netzel@uq.edu.au
+61 7 344 32476

Overview

Understanding in vitro bioaccessibility (matrix release and availability for intestinal absorption) as well as the much more complex in vivo bioavailability and metabolism (including microbial degradation in the gut) of dietary phytochemicals are crucial in understanding and predicting their bioactivity and potential health benefits in humans.

Dr Michael Netzel is a graduate of the Justus-Liebig University Giessen, Germany (Master and PhD). Before joining QAAFI as a Senior Research Fellow in August 2013, he was a Research Scientist at CSIRO. Other previous academic and professional positions held by Dr Netzel include, Feodor Lynen Research Fellow (Alexander von Humboldt-Foundation) at Food Science Australia (2005 and 2006-2007), Visiting Research Scientist at Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada (2005) and Research Team Leader at the Friedrich-Schiller University Jena, Germany (1999-2006). He is an Editor of the ‘Journal of Food Composition and Analysis’ (Elsevier), a Review-Editor of ‘Frontiers in Nutrition’ (Scientific Direct) and a Member of the Editorial Board of ‘Food Research International’ (Elsevier). Dr Netzel was also a Co-Editor of ‘Acta Horticulturae (1106) 2015’ (Proceeding of the 6th International Symposium on Fruits & Vegetables for Human Health – FAVHealth2014) and ‘Technology for Food Quality’ (The Queensland Government, 2012). He has strong collaborative links to the Technical University of Munich, Germany (Prof. Michael Rychlik, Chair – Analytical Food Chemistry), which is one of UQ’s strategic partners in Europe.

Research Interests

  • Phytochemicals and Health
    My main research interests are related to phytochemicals (polyphenols (bound & free), carotenoids and vitamins), their analytical determination, binding characteristics within the plant (food) matrix, structural modifications/degradation during processing and digestion, bioaccessibility as well as bioavailability and metabolism (”from the raw produce to the absorbed and metabolised bioactive compound”). Assessing the “nutritional value” of biofortified produce such as the anthocyanin-rich Queen Garnet plum, “dark” strawberries, high-zeaxanthin sweet-corn and polyphenol-rich sorghum as well as the phytochemical profiling of unexploited tropical fruits grown in Australia, are the current research focus.

Qualifications

  • Doctor of Philosophy, Justus Liebig University Giessen

Publications

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Grants

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Supervision

  • Doctor Philosophy

  • Doctor Philosophy

  • Doctor Philosophy

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Publications

Book Chapter

  • Fanning, Kent, Stanley, Roger, Topp, Bruce, Russell, Dougal and Netzel, Michael (2016). Plum, prune, and ume juices. In Fereidoon Shahidi and Cesarettin Alasalvar (Ed.), Handbook of functional beverages and human health (pp. 501-512) Boca Raton, FL, United States: CRC Press.

  • Ahmed, Faruq, Fanning, Kent, Schuhmann, Holger, Netzel, Michael and Schenk, Peer M. (2013). Microalgae: a valuable source of natural carotenoids with potential health benefits. In Masayoshi Yamaguchi (Ed.), Carotenoids: Food Sources, Production and Health Benefits (pp. 143-164) Hauppauge, NY, USA: Nova Science Publishers.

  • Netzel, M., Fanning, K., Netzel, G., Frank, T., Zabaras, D., Russell, D. and Stanley, R. (2012). Urinary pharmacokinetics of Queen Garnet plum anthocyanins in healthy human subjects. In Bhimanagouda S Patil (Ed.), Emerging Trends in Dietary Components for Preventing and Combating Disease (pp. 375-392) Washington DC, United States: ACS Publications. doi:10.1021/bk-2012-1093.ch021

  • Allmann, S., Strass, G., Kranl, K., Frank, T., Bitsch, I., Bitsch, R. and Netzel, M. (2005). Bioactivity and bioactive compounds of seabuckthorn fruit juice. In Virendra Singh, Yang B, Kallio H, Bala M, Sawhney RC, Gupta RK, Moersel JT, Rongsen L and Tolkachev ON (Ed.), Seabuckthorn (Hippophae L.): A Multipurpose Wonder Plant, Vol. II: Biochemistry and Pharmacology (pp. 402-412) New Dehli, India: Daya Publishing House.

  • Bitsch, I. and Netzel, M. (2005). Ernaehrungswissenschaften. In Wolfgang Frede (Ed.), Taschenbuch für Lebensmittelchemiker, 2. Aufl (pp. 1001-1022) Berlin & Heidelberg, Germany: Springer.

  • Netzel, M., Allmann, S., Strass, G., Kranl, K., Aman, R., Schieber, A., Carle, R., Bitsch, I. and Bitsch, R. (2005). Stabilty of hydrophilic and lipophilic antioxidants of seabuckthorn under different storage conditions. In Singh, V., Yang, B., Kallio, H., Bala, M., Sawhney, R. C., Gupta, R. K., Moersel, J. T., Rongsen, L. and Tolkachev, O. N. (Ed.), Seabuckthorn (Hippophae L.): A Multipurpose Wonder Plant, Vol. II: Biochemistry and Pharmacology (pp. 331-336) New Dehli, India: Daya Publishing House.

  • Netzel, M., Strass, G., Janssen, M., Bitsch, I. and Bitsch, R. (2000). Bioavailability of blackcurrant anthocyanins in humans. In Dietary Anticarcinogens and Antimutagens (pp. 76-79) Norwich, England: Elsevier. doi:10.1533/9781845698188.2.76

  • Netzel, M., Shahrzad, S., Winter, A. and Bitsch, I. (2000). Gallic acid in black tea and its bioavailability for man. In Johnson, I. T. and Fenwick, G. R. (Ed.), Dietary Anticarcinogens and Antimutagens: Chemical and Biological Aspects (pp. 80-83) Norwich, England: The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  • Bitsch, I., Netzel, M., Ziems, M. and Wenisch, S. (1998). Untersuchungen zur neuroprotektiven Wirkung von Benfotiamin. In Gries, F. A. and Federlin, K. F. (Ed.), Benfotiamin in der Therapie von Polyneuropathien (pp. 35-38) Stuttgart, Germany: Georg Thieme Verlag.

Journal Article

Conference Publication

Edited Outputs

Grants (Administered at UQ)

PhD and MPhil Supervision

Current Supervision

Completed Supervision