Professor Jason Stokes

Professor

School of Chemical Engineering
Faculty of Engineering, Architecture and Information Technology
jason.stokes@uq.edu.au
+61 7 336 54361

Overview

Jason Stokes is Professor and Director of Research in the UQ School of Chemical Engineering. His formal qualifications include a Bachelor of Engineering (Chemical) and PhD from The University of Melbourne, Australia. He spent 10 years (1999 – 2008) as a research scientist at Unilever’s corporate research laboratory in the United Kingdom, and joined The University of Queensland in October 2008.

Jason's core interest at UQ is in the multi-scale deformation (from rheology to tribology) of soft matter systems and multiphase fluids, which is applied to diverse areas such as food oral processing and sensory science, food structure design and engineering, plant cell wall micromechanics, and high pressure high temperature (HPHT) fluids for enhanced geothermal systems.

Jason Stokes’ PhD concerned the complex flow behavior of viscoelastic fluids, supervised by Prof David V Boger FRS at The University of Melbourne and in collaboration with the CSIRO fluid mechanics laboratory. He joined Unilever in 1999 and developed expertise on a range of soft matter systems including food colloids, emulsions, biopolymers, hydrogels, microgels, foams, and surfactants, as well as consumer products such as skin creams, ice cream, beverages, dressings and mayonnaise. In his industrial research he sought to develop insights into the relationship between microstructure, processing and rheology. He was also instrumental in developing and applying new measurement techniques in thin film rheology and tribology to obtain advanced insights into the functionality and sensory perception of product components during food oral processing and “in use” application of personal care products. He has patents on point of sale processing of skin creams and super-stable foams.

Jason Stokes is currently a consultant for several international and national food companies, and is on the experts advisory panel for a New Zealand Primary Growth Partnership in Food Structure Design. He was awarded a UQ Partners in Research Excellence Award in 2014 and the British Society of Rheology Annual Award 2013. He is a member of the editorial board for the Journal of Texture Studies and Journal of Biotribology. He h

Current Research

Jason Stokes’ Food & Soft Matter Engineering group is funded by grants from the Australian Research Council (Discovery Projects, Linkage Project, Industrial Transformation Training Centre) and in partnership with several major international food companies. His research is providing enabling technologies and approaches to design healthier consumer acceptable food products, principally through the use of rheology, tribology and surface-science that are uncovering the physical basis of food and beverage organoleptic properties. The team also investigates food structure design to meet the demands of the industry to make more efficient use of ingredients and enhance consumer benefits. The research includes concern for consumers with swallowing dysfunction (dysphagia).

Jason Stokes was an Associate Investigator in the ARC Centre of Excellence on Plant Cell Walls (2011-2017). His role was to integrate polymer, colloidal, interfacial and material science principles to develop relationships between fundamental characteristics of plant cell wall systems and their material properties. His team’s research lead to new understanding how structure at different length scales influences properties and utilisation of cell walls in diverse applications. (http://www.plantcellwalls.org.au)

Jason Stokes is investigating the flow behaviour of structured fluids under extreme pressure and temperatures for clean energy and deep earth resources as part of the Queensland Geothermal Energy Centre of Excellence (QGECE). The inability of existing fluids to perform under extreme HPHT limits the extraction of deep underground energy resources; his team’s research is seeking to overcome this limitation and establish leadership in HPHT rheology.

As part of the Rheology, Tribology and Biointerfaces Laboratory, his research team also investigate the fundamental studies into the rheological, thin film rheology, tribology, biotribology and interfacial properties of microgels and hydrogel microparticles and nanoparticles, biopolymers, emulsions and saliva. A particular interest is uncovering how mechanical properties at the nano and microscale influence macroscale rheology and lubrication.

Qualifications

  • Bachelor of Engineering (Honours - H1), University of Melbourne
  • Doctor of Philosophy - Engineering, University of Melbourne

Publications

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Grants

View all Grants

Supervision

View all Supervision

Available Projects

  • Project in the area of Food and Soft Matter Engineering are available with specific details to be discussed with prospective students. The research group has many associations with industry and projects needs to be designed specifically. Our industry partners are international and national companies spaning foods, personal care, and pharmaceuticals.

  • The project aims to develop new principles of viscoelastic lubrication in soft contacts. New insights into friction behaviour arising from complex fluid-substrate interactions are expected to be generated using techniques and interdisciplinary approaches that bridge rheology, tribology and surface science. Outcomes from the research should provide significant benefits to diverse fields including advanced materials and complex fluids, engineering tribology, biolubrication and food structure design. This project is part of a prestigious Australian Research Council Discovery Project.

  • Projects seek to relate physical measurements such as rheology and tribology to the flow and deformation of foods during consumption that affects sensory perception and consumer preferences. We are particularly interested in connecting chemical engineering, physiology, and food sensory science. These studies are used to assist industry to rationally design processed foods and beverages with consideration for formulating consumer acceptable healthy & nutritious foods and sustainable process engineering.

View all Available Projects

Publications

Book Chapter

  • Stokes, Jason R. (2014). Aqueous lubrication and food emulsions. In Nicholas D. Spencer (Ed.), Aqueous lubrication: natural and biomimetic approaches (pp. 73-102) Singapore: World Scientific Publishing Company. doi:10.1142/9789814313773_0003

  • Stokes, Jason R. (2013). Saliva lubrication. In Jane Wang and Yip-Wah Chung (Ed.), Encyclopedia of Tribology (pp. 2971-2977) New York, NY, USA: Springer. doi:10.1007/978-0-387-92897-5

  • Stokes, Jason R. (2012). 'Oral' Rheology. In Jianshe Chen and Lina Engelen (Ed.), Food oral processing : fundamentals of eating and sensory perception (pp. 225-263) Chichester, West Sussex, UK: Wiley-Blackwell. doi:10.1002/9781444360943.ch11

  • Stokes, Jason R. (2012). 'Oral' Tribology. In Jianshe Chen and Lina Engelen (Ed.), Food oral processing : fundamentals of eating and sensory perception (pp. 265-287) Chichester, West Sussex, UK: Wiley-Blackwell. doi:10.1002/9781444360943.ch12

  • Stokes, Jason R. (2012). Food biopolymer gels, microgel and nanogel structures, formation and rheology. In Bhesh Bhandari and Yrjo H Roos (Ed.), Food materials science and engineering (pp. 151-176) West Sussex, United Kingdom: Wiley - Blackwell. doi:10.1002/9781118373903.ch6

  • Kravchuk, Olena, Torley, Peter and Stokes, Jason R. (2012). Food texture is only partly rheology. In Bhesh Bhandari and Yrjo H Roos (Ed.), Food materials science and engineering (pp. 349-368) Chichester, West Sussex, United Kingdom: Wiley-Blackwell.

  • Stokes, Jason R. (2011). Rheology of industrial microgels. In Alberto Fernandez-Nieves, Hans M. Wyss, Johan Mattsson and David A. Weitz (Ed.), Microgel suspensions: Fundamentals and applications (pp. 327-354) Weinheim, Germany: Wiley-VCH Verlag. doi:10.1002/9783527632992.ch13

Journal Article

Conference Publication

  • Shewan, H. M. and Stokes, J. R. (2012). Biopolymer microgel suspension rheology as a function of particle modulus and effective phase volume. In: Peter A. Williams and Glynn O. Phillips, Proceedings of the 16th Gums and Stabilisers for the Food Industry Conference. 16th Gums and Stabilisers for the Food Industry Conference, Wageningen, Netherlands, (165-174). 28 June -1 July 2011. doi:10.1039/9781849734554-00165

  • Punyadeera, C., Nouwens, A. S., Stokes, J. R., Yakubov, G. and Cooper-White, J. (2010). Elucidation of changes in human saliva protein profiles during resting and stimulated states. In: Human Proteome World Congress (HUPO 2010), Sydney, Australia, (). 19 - 23 September 2010.

  • Myant, C., Fowell, M., Stokes, J. and Spikes, H. (2009). Film thickness study for soft contacts using an optical interferometric technique. In: Proceedings of the World Tribology Congress 2009. World Tribology Congress 2009, Kyoto, Japan, (). 6 - 11 September 2009.

  • Stokes, J. (2009). From Rheology to Tribology. In: Chemeca 2009: Engineering our future, proceedings. CHEMECA 2009, Perth, (1-10). 27-30 September.

  • Bongaerts, Jeroen H. H., Rossetti, Damiano, Yakubov, Gleb E., Macakova, Lubica and Stokes, Jason R. (2008). COLL 344-Lubrication of the oral interface by saliva. In: Abstracts of Papers of the American Chemical Society. 235th American-Chemical-Society National Meeting, New Orleans La, (). Apr 06-10, 2008.

  • Stokes, J. R., Davies, G. A., Macakova, L., Yakubov, G., Bongaerts, J. and Rossetti, D. (2008). From rheology to tribology: Multiscale dynamics of biofluids, food emulsions and soft matter. In: Co, A, Leal, LG, Colby, RH and Giacomin, AJ, AIP Conference Proceedings: The XVth International Congress on Rheology: The Society of Rheology 80th Annual Meeting.. The XVth International Congress on Rheology, Monterey, California, (1171-1173). August 3 - 8, 2008. doi:10.1063/1.2964505

  • Stokes, J. R. and Frith, W. J. (2002). Predicting the rheology of water-in-water emulsions. In: Peter A. Williams and Glyn O. Phillips, Gums and stabilisers for the food industry 11. Eleventh Gums and Stabilisers for the Food Industry Conference-Crossing Boundaries, The North East Wales Institute, Wrexham, UK, (128-136). 2-6 July 2001. doi:10.1039/9781847551016-00128

  • Stokes, J. R., Graham, L. J. W. and Boger, D. V. (1996). Vortex breakdown in confined swirling flow of a dilute flexible polymer solution. In: Proceedings of the XIIth International Congress on Rheology. XIIth International Congress on Rheology, Quebec City, Canada, (359-360). 18-23 August, 1996.

Other Outputs

Grants (Administered at UQ)

PhD and MPhil Supervision

Current Supervision

  • Doctor Philosophy — Principal Advisor

  • Doctor Philosophy — Principal Advisor

    Other advisors:

  • Doctor Philosophy — Principal Advisor

    Other advisors:

  • Doctor Philosophy — Principal Advisor

  • Doctor Philosophy — Principal Advisor

  • Doctor Philosophy — Principal Advisor

    Other advisors:

  • Doctor Philosophy — Principal Advisor

  • Doctor Philosophy — Associate Advisor

  • Master Philosophy — Associate Advisor

    Other advisors:

  • Doctor Philosophy — Associate Advisor

  • Doctor Philosophy — Associate Advisor

  • Doctor Philosophy — Associate Advisor

    Other advisors:

Completed Supervision

Possible Research Projects

Note for students: The possible research projects listed on this page may not be comprehensive or up to date. Always feel free to contact the staff for more information, and also with your own research ideas.

  • Project in the area of Food and Soft Matter Engineering are available with specific details to be discussed with prospective students. The research group has many associations with industry and projects needs to be designed specifically. Our industry partners are international and national companies spaning foods, personal care, and pharmaceuticals.

  • The project aims to develop new principles of viscoelastic lubrication in soft contacts. New insights into friction behaviour arising from complex fluid-substrate interactions are expected to be generated using techniques and interdisciplinary approaches that bridge rheology, tribology and surface science. Outcomes from the research should provide significant benefits to diverse fields including advanced materials and complex fluids, engineering tribology, biolubrication and food structure design. This project is part of a prestigious Australian Research Council Discovery Project.

  • Projects seek to relate physical measurements such as rheology and tribology to the flow and deformation of foods during consumption that affects sensory perception and consumer preferences. We are particularly interested in connecting chemical engineering, physiology, and food sensory science. These studies are used to assist industry to rationally design processed foods and beverages with consideration for formulating consumer acceptable healthy & nutritious foods and sustainable process engineering.